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 History isn't what happened, but a story of what happened. And there are always different versions, different stories, about the same events. One version might revolve mainly around a specific set of facts while another version might minimize them or not include them at all.
      Like stories, each of these different versions of history contain different lessons. Some histories tell us that ourleaders, at least, have always tried to do right for everyone. Others remark that the emperors don't have the slaves' best interests at heart. Some teach us that this is both what has always been and what always will be. Others counsel that we shouldn't mistake transient dominance for intrinsic superiority. Lastly, some histories paint a picture where only the elites have the power to change the world, while others point out that social change is rarely commanded from the top down.

       Regardless of the value of these many lessons, History isn't what happened, but the stories of what happened and the lessons these stories include. The very selection of which histories to teach in a society shapes our view of how what is came to be and, in turn, what we understand as possible. This choice of which history to teach can never be "neutral" or "objective." Those who choose, either following a set agenda or guided by hidden prejudices, serve their interests. Their interests could be to continue this world as it now stands or to make a new world. 
      We cannot simply be passive. We must choose whose interests are best: those who want to keep things going as they are or those who want to work to make a better world. If we choose the latter, we must seek out the tools we will need. History is just one tool to shape our understanding of our world. And every tool is a weapon if you hold it right.

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Email: thedirectorate@historyisaweapon.com.

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Blog Page: 
http://blog.historyisaweapon.com 
 
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Understanding Power : The indispensible Chomsky: The indispensible...

By: Noam Chomsky; John Schoeffel, Editor

In a series of enlightening and wide-ranging discussions, all published here for the first time, Chomsky radically reinterprets the events of the past three decades, covering topics from foreign policy during Vietnam to the decline of welfare under the Clinton administration. And as he elucidates the connection between America’s imperialistic foreign policy and the decline of domestic social services, Chomsky also discerns the necessary steps to take toward social change...

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Excerpts from Understanding Power

By: Noam Chomsky

Excerpts from Understanding Power

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Black History

By: Gil Scott-Heron

Poem by Gil Scott-Heron

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From The Autobiography of Malcolm X

By: Malcolm Little

Excerpts from The Autobiography of Malcolm X

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Malcolm X on Afro-American History

By: Malcolm Little

Excerpts of writings and speeches by Malcolm X on Afro-American History.

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The Mid-Education of the Negro

By: Carter Godwin Woodson; Charles H. Wesley, Editor

First published in 1933, the thesis of Dr. Woodson's book is that African-Americans of his day were being culturally indoctrinated, rather than taught, in American schools. This conditioning, he claims, causes African-Americans to become dependent and to seek out inferior places in the greater society of which they are a part. He challenges his readers to become autodidacts and to "do for themselves", regardless of what they were taught: History shows that it does not ma...

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Let My People Go : An address delivered at the conference of the S...

By: Carlos Montezuma

1915 speech delivered by Carlos Montezuma in Lawrence, Kansas for the Society of American Indians Conference, which was later published in The American Indian Magazine (January-March 1916, Vol. 4, No. 1), and then reprinted in various newspapers. Montezuma's speech was also read during the first sessions of the Sixty-Fourth Congress in 1916, and included in the Congressional Record.

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The Axe at the Root

By: William Thurston Brown

Pocket Library of Socialism, No.23, Jan. 15, 1901 Rev. Brown was principal of the Modern School

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From A People's History of the United States

By: Howard Zinn

A People's History of the United States is a 1980 non-fiction book by American historian and political scientist Howard Zinn. In the book, Zinn seeks to present an alternate interpretation of the history of the United States. According to the author, American history is to a large extent the exploitation of the majority by an elite minority.

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Not Christianity, But Priestcraft

By: Lucretia Mott

1854 Essay by Lucretia Mott taken from Miriam Schneir's, "Feminism: The Essential Historical Writings," Vintage Books, 1972, pp.100-102.

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A Great Difference Between Red and White

By: Sagoyowatha Red Jacket

A Great Difference between Red and White is a speech written by Sago-Yo-Watha (Red Jacket), Iroquois, 1805 and published in Daniel Drake's book "Lives of Celebrated American Indians" (Boston, Bradbury, Soden & Co. 1843), 283–87.

“Yet we did not fear them. We took them to be friends. They called us brothers. We believed them and gave them a larger seat ... they wanted more land; they wanted our country. Our eyes were opened, and our minds became uneasy.” “You have got our country, but are not satisfied; you want to force your religion upon us.” “How shall we know when to believe, being so often deceived by the white people?”

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From The Narrative of the Life of Fredrick Douglass, an American Slave

By: Frederick Douglass

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass is an 1845 memoir and treatise on abolition written by famous orator and former slave Frederick Douglass. It is generally held to be the most famous of a number of narratives written by former slaves during the same period. In factual detail, the text describes the events of his life and is considered to be one of the most influential pieces of literature to fuel the abolitionist movement of the early 19th century in the United...

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Die Nigger Die : A Political Autobiography

By: H. Rap Brown

More than any other black leader, H. Rap Brown (Imam Jamil Abdullah Al-Amin), chairman of the radical Black Power organization Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), came to symbolize the ideology of black revolution. This autobiography—which was first published in 1969, went through seven printings and has long been unavailable—chronicles the making of a revolutionary. It is much more than a personal history, however; it is a call to arms, an urgent message t...

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The American Revolution : Pages from a Negro Worker's Notebook

By: James Boggs

James Boggs, born in Marion Junction, Alabama in 1919, never dreamed of becoming President or a locomotive engineer. He grew up in a world where the white folks are gentlemen by day and Ku Klux Klanners at night. Marion Junction is in Dallas County where as late as 1963, although African-Americans made up over 57 percent of the total county population of 57,000, only 130 were registered voters. After graduating from Dunbar High School in Bessemer, Alabama, in 1937, Boggs...

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A Peopleʻs History of the United States

By: Howard Zinn

A People's History of the United States is a 1980 non-fiction book by American historian and political scientist Howard Zinn. In the book, Zinn seeks to present an alternate interpretation of the history of the United States. According to the author, American history is to a large extent the exploitation of the majority by an elite minority. (Wikipedia)

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