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Fornander Collection of Hawaiian Antiquities and Folk-Lore. Vol. 5

By: Abraham Fornander

In this second series of the Fornander Collection of Hawaiian Folk-lore, with the exception of a few transpositions, as mentioned in the preceding volume, the order of the author has been observed in the main by grouping together, first, the more important legends and traditions of the race, of universal acceptance through- out the whole group, followed by the briefer folk-tales of more local character. A few of similar names occur in the collection, indicating, in some cases, different versions of the same story, a number of the more popular legends having several versions. The closing part of this volume, to embrace the series of Lahainaluna School compositions of myth and traditional character, it is hoped will be found to possess educational value and interest. No liberties have been taken with the original text, the plan, as outlined, being to present the various stories and papers as written, regardless of historic or other discrepancies, variance in such matters being treated in the notes thereto....

Maihuna was the father and Malaiakalani was the mother of Kawelo, who was born in Hanamaulu,1 Kauai. There were five children in the family. The first was Kawelomahamahaia; the second was Kaweloleikoo. These two were males; after these two came Kaenakuokalani, a female; next to her was Kawelo leimakua and the last child was Kamalama. Kaweloleimakua, or Kawelo is the subject of this story....

His Birth and Early Life—Change to Oahu and Fame Attained There -- 2 -- Size of Kauahoa—Is Killed by Kawelo—Kawelo Vanquishes Aikanaka -- 56 -- Kalonaikahailaau—Kawelo Equips Himself to Fight Aikanaka—Arrival at Kauai -- 20 -- Division of Kauai Lands—Aikanaka Becomes a Tiller of Ground -- 60 -- Commencement of Battle Between Kawelo and the People of Kauai -- 38 -- Kaeleha and Aikanaka Rebel Against Kawelo—Their Battle and Supposed Death of Kawelo -- 62 -- Kaehuikiawakea —Kaihupepenuiamouo and Muno— Walaheeikio and Moomooikio -- 42 -- Temple of Aikanaka—How Kawelo Came to Life Again—He Slaughters His Opponents and Becomes Again Ruler of kauai -- 66 -- Kahakaloa—His Dead by Kawelo -- 48 -- Kauahoa—Kawelo Fears to Attack Him—Seeks to Win Him by a Chant—Kauahoa Replies -- 52 -- His High Office—Laamaomao, His Wind Gourd In Disfavor with the King He Moves to Molokai—Has a Son Whom He Instructs Carefully—Dreams of Keawenuiaumi Setting Out in Search for Him—Prepares with His Son to Meet the King -- 72 -- Prepares to Meet Keawenuiaumi in Search of Pakaa—Canoe Fleet of Six District Chiefs, Recognized, are Taunted as They Pass— Keawenuiaumi, G...

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Fornander Collection of Hawaiian Antiquities and Folk-Lore. Vol. 4

By: Abraham Fornander

Ma keia mele i hakuia e Kahakuikamoana, ua maopopo ka mookuauhau o ka loaa ana o keia mau aina. A mehe mea la no loko mai o Tahiti ka hoomaka ana e loaa na kanaka ma keia mau mokupuni, aka, aole i maopopo ma keia mau lalani...

According to this tradition Hawaii just rose up from the ocean, together with the group of islands of Tahiti, and it would seem the Tahitian Islands were the first group in this Pacific Ocean, and Hawaii was of a later appearance, as shown by the lines in the mele composed by Kahakuikamoana running thus: “Now cometh forth Hawaiinuiakea, Appeareth out of darkness.An island, a land is born, The row of islands from Nuumea;The group of islands at the borders of Tahiti.”...

Prefatory Remarks -- 2 -- Story of Opuukahonua -- 20 -- Birth of the Islands -- 6 -- Genealogy of Opuukanonua -- 24 -- About Wakea -- 12 -- First Sight of Foreigners -- 28 -- Genealogy of the Islands of Hawaii -- 16 -- -- Aukelenuiaiku and His Unkind Brethren -- 32 -- How Aukele and Namakaokahai Showed Their Useful Things -- 68 -- How Aukele Fell into the Pit of Kamooinanen and Profiled Thereby -- 38 -- How the Brothers-in-law of Aukele Taught Him to Fly -- 72 -- Return of Aukele and the Benefits He Receied in Facing Death -- 42 -- How Namakaokahai Gae Eerything to Aukele, and the Battle Between Kuwahailo and Aukele -- 74 -- How Aukele Sailed with His Brothers in Search of Land -- 46 -- Battle Fought by the Brothers of Aukele and Their Death -- 52 -- Relating to Kaumaiilunaoholaniku -- 80 -- How Aukele Went in Search of the Water of Life of Kane -- 82 -- How Aukele Got Out of Trouble and Was Rewarded -- 56 -- How Aukele Brought Hack to Life His Nephew -- 96 -- How Aukele Became the Husband of Namakaokahai -- 62 -- How Namakaokahai Quarreled With Her -- 102 -- How Aukele was Carried off to the Cliff by Halulu -- 64 -- Ankele’s Trip...

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Fornander Collection of Hawaiian Antiquities and Folk-Lore. Vol. 6

By: Abraham Fornander

This third series of the Fornander Collection of Hawaiian Folklore, in its varied character, presents valuable features for antiquarian and ethnic students of Polynesia in general and Hawaii in particular. The papers included in Part I, mostly the result of S. N. Haleole’s researches in the work and workings of the Sorcery priesthood, is a revelation of the power and influence of that body over the Hawaiian race in all their vocations, and through his connections with members of the order he may be said to have written with a clear knowledge of his subject. The opening paper on Religious Ceremonies of the Temple came to the collection from Dr. W. D. Alexander, as the contribution of Kamakau, of Kaawaloa, an eminent authority in his day, a noiau (skilled in such matters), and reputed to have been a chanter of Kame-hameha’s court. Part II. embraces historic studies and fragmentary notes of Judge Fornander, selected from his miscellaneous papers, as affording an insight into his line of research work, hence, has little of the original Hawaiian and translation feature of the other parts. Part III. is devoted entirely to cha...

The mother being faint from unpleasant sensations, and groaning at the time, without appetite for food, they (the attendants) sought to ascertain her cravings. Then certain women came to her and asked, “What sort of illness have you that you hide yourself?” She said to them, “I do not know; (I am) simply languid. ” The women then said to her, “Let’s see; we will examine you. ” She took off her garment and they examined her body while one of the women took hold of and felt of her breasts, which, on releasing the hand, they observed the contraction of the nipples of her breasts, and exclaimed, “You probably have a child; you are likely pregnant with one; tell us. ” One of the women said that she was simply bloated; there was no child. Another woman, however, persisted, “You are pregnant. ” They each asked her, “How many months since you last menstruated?” “Two, since my menses period has passed. ” One of the women asked her, ‘What do you crave to eat?” “There is nothing that I long for. I try hard to eat."...

Preface -- 1 -- Concerning Ancient Religious Ceremonies -- 2 -- Various Heathen Prayers -- 46 -- Concerning the Construction of the Heiau -- 52 -- History of the Hawaiian Priesthood Called the Order of Sorcery -- 56 -- History of the Hawaiian Priesthood in Olden Time Called Hoomanamana -- 66 -- Explanatory Remarks—History of the Sorcery Priesthood—Divisions and Ordinances—Sacrifice Services of the Student—Divination— Praying to Death—Divination Relating to Houses—Divining Omens by the Clouds—Foreítelling the Weather—The Healing Priests— Canoe Dreams—Adverse Signs—the Rainbow and the Rain—The Excrements—Bananas— The Mud-Hen—Auguries in Relation to Kings —The Massage Priest—the Hoounauna Priest —The Hookomokomo Priest—the Makani Priest—The Love-Inducing Priest—The One-oneihonua—Signs Pertaining to Fishermen— Occupation of Farmers—Dreams—Auguries Relating to the Priesthood—Moles—Favorable Birth Months—Auguries of the Canoe-Hewing Priests—Spear Hurling—Bone Breaking Trading as Related to Agriculture—Ceremonial Functions of the Priesthood—Method of Building the Temple—Some Famous Priests -- An Account of Cultivation -- 160 -- Dry Plantin...

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