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Political power in the United States over time

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Title: Political power in the United States over time  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Politics of the United States, United States Presidents and control of Congress, Party divisions of United States Congresses
Collection: Politics of the United States
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Political power in the United States over time

Contents

  • Control of United States Congress 1
  • Dominate Party 2
  • Party Control of Congress 3
    • Senate Control by Party Past 100 Years 3.1
    • House Control by Party Past 100 Years 3.2
    • Senate and House Control by Party Past 100 Years 3.3
    • Full Congress and White House Control by Party Past 100 Years 3.4
  • Party Control of White House 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6

Control of United States Congress

Since 1855 the United States Congress has been dominated by a two party system comprised on one side by the Democratic Party and the Republican Party on the other. While other political parties over time have and may still exist, no other parties have possessed the support, organization and historical legacy these two parties do.

Senate House of Representatives
Control of the U.S. Senate:1855-2010[1][2][3]
Control of the U.S. House:1855-2010[1][2][3]

Dominate Party

The two party political system of the United States has been dominated by the Democratic party historically. Except in the case of the United States Senate, and only by 6 years, the Republican party on average has held power only 2/3rd of the time as compared with the democratic party. In particular, over the past 100 years the Democratic party has held power nearly twice as long as the Republicans. In fact, this average is even higher when looking at complete control of both the Senate and House in favor of Democrats and even higher still when looking at the times a single party has controlled not only the complete Congress but also the White House.

Party Control of Congress

Note: The following statistics consider 2001 as a year in which the Democrats controlled the Senate, although they did not control it for the entire year.

Senate Control by Party Past 100 Years

The following statistics reflect the years each political party has controlled a majority in the Senate over the past 100 years (1916–2015).
Party Years in Control
Democrats: 65 yrs
Republicans: 35 yrs

House Control by Party Past 100 Years

The following statistics reflect the years each political party has controlled a majority in the House of Representatives over the past 100 years (1916–2015).

Party Years in Control
Democrats: 65 yrs
Republicans: 35 yrs

Senate and House Control by Party Past 100 Years

The following statistics reflect the years each political party has control a majority in both the Senate and House of Representatives concurrently over the past 100 years (1916–2015).

Party Years in Control
Democrats: 57 yrs
Republicans: 27 yrs
Neither Party: 16 yrs

Full Congress and White House Control by Party Past 100 Years

The following statistics reflect the years each political party has controlled a majority across both the Senate and House of Representatives and White House concurrently over the past 100 years (1916–2015).

Party Years in Control
Democrats: 35 yrs
Republicans: 16 yrs
Neither Party: 49 yrs

Party Control of White House

Party Years in Control
Democrats: 52 yrs
Republicans: 48 yrs

See also

References

  1. ^ a b
  2. ^ a b
  3. ^ a b
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