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July 1924

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July 1924

1924
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

The following events occurred in July 1924:

Contents

  • July 1, 1924 (Tuesday) 1
  • July 2, 1924 (Wednesday) 2
  • July 3, 1924 (Thursday) 3
  • July 4, 1924 (Friday) 4
  • July 5, 1924 (Saturday) 5
  • July 6, 1924 (Sunday) 6
  • July 7, 1924 (Monday) 7
  • July 8, 1924 (Tuesday) 8
  • July 9, 1924 (Wednesday) 9
  • July 10, 1924 (Thursday) 10
  • July 11, 1924 (Friday) 11
  • July 12, 1924 (Saturday) 12
  • July 13, 1924 (Sunday) 13
  • July 14, 1924 (Monday) 14
  • July 15, 1924 (Tuesday) 15
  • July 16, 1924 (Wednesday) 16
  • July 17, 1924 (Thursday) 17
  • July 18, 1924 (Friday) 18
  • July 19, 1924 (Saturday) 19
  • July 20, 1924 (Sunday) 20
  • July 21, 1924 (Monday) 21
  • July 22, 1924 (Tuesday) 22
  • July 23, 1924 (Wednesday) 23
  • July 24, 1924 (Thursday) 24
  • July 25, 1924 (Friday) 25
  • July 26, 1924 (Saturday) 26
  • July 27, 1924 (Sunday) 27
  • July 28, 1924 (Monday) 28
  • July 29, 1924 (Tuesday) 29
  • July 30, 1924 (Wednesday) 30
  • July 31, 1924 (Thursday) 31
  • References 32

July 1, 1924 (Tuesday)

July 2, 1924 (Wednesday)

  • The American flag stolen from the embassy in Tokyo was recovered and the Akasaka district's chief of police resigned over the incident.[2]
  • Inventor Guglielmo Marconi addressed the Royal Society of Arts in London describing his new beam system of short-wave wireless transmission. Marconi said this system could transmit more words per day between distant countries than was possible before, and more economically as well, resulting in a general reduction in telegraphic rates.[4]
  • Italian border patrollers shot and killed two Serbian soldiers and wounded a civilian bystander at the Serbian boundary line.[5]
  • Portuguese Prime Minister Álvaro de Castro fought a sword duel with Flight Captain Ribeiro over a political dispute. Ribiero was wounded in the arm.[6]

July 3, 1924 (Thursday)

July 4, 1924 (Friday)

July 5, 1924 (Saturday)

July 6, 1924 (Sunday)

July 7, 1924 (Monday)

July 8, 1924 (Tuesday)

July 9, 1924 (Wednesday)

July 10, 1924 (Thursday)

July 11, 1924 (Friday)

July 12, 1924 (Saturday)

  • Paavo Nurmi won the 10,000m cross-country race at the Olympics and then helped to win another gold medal for Finland in the team event. The races were held in blistering heat of 45 degrees Celsius; cross-country races were never an event at the Olympics again because of the number of runners collapsing from heat exhaustion.[16]
  • The airmen attempting to be the first to fly around the world landed in Bucharest from Constantinople.[27]
  • The original trademark application for Kleenex was filed by Kimberly-Clark Corporation.[28]

July 13, 1924 (Sunday)

July 14, 1924 (Monday)

July 15, 1924 (Tuesday)

July 16, 1924 (Wednesday)

July 17, 1924 (Thursday)

July 18, 1924 (Friday)

  • U.S. Vice Consul Robert Imbrie was beaten to death by an angry mob in Tehran, Iran after he photographed a gathering at a sacred watering place where a miracle was said to have taken place. Police were slow to help because they were intimidated by the soldiers of the Cossack Brigade, the real authority in Iran, who were participating in the attack. Imbrie's companion Allen Dulles survived the beating.[36][37]

July 19, 1924 (Saturday)

July 20, 1924 (Sunday)

July 21, 1924 (Monday)

July 22, 1924 (Tuesday)

  • Pierre de Coubertin lashed back at criticism of the games, calling the Paris press guilty of "magnifying the unpleasant incidents instead of fulfilling its duty and educating the people to a big sport ideal." He also said it was "idiotic" of the French government to build Colombes Stadium so far outside of Paris without the proper transportation facilities. Some of the unfortunate incidents referred to included the French booing of the American flag at a rugby match and complaints over accommodations in the tennis tournament.[42]
  • Japan passed an amendment to its Nationality Law so that Japanese children born in the United States and other jus soli countries would automatically lose their Japanese nationality unless it was expressly retained within fourteen days of birth. The amendment also allowed dual citizens in those countries to easily renounce their Japanese citizenship.[43]
  • Died: Albert Bruce-Joy, 81, Irish sculptor

July 23, 1924 (Wednesday)

  • 20 children were trampled to death and 17 injured as patrons fled a movie house in Veracruz, Mexico when the film caught fire.[44]
  • The judge in the Leopold and Loeb case fully explained to the defendants the consequences of pleading guilty and asked them to confirm their plea, which they did. The trial now became a question of whether or not the killers would receive the death penalty.[41]
  • Died: Frank Frost Abbott, 84, American classical scholar

July 24, 1924 (Thursday)

  • Light heavyweight boxing champion Polo Grounds in New York.[45]
  • Died: Palmer Cox, 84, Canadian illustrator and author

July 25, 1924 (Friday)

  • The new issue of Workers' Weekly, the newspaper of the Communist Party of Great Britain, included a provocative article entitled "An Open Letter to the Fighting Forces" which included passages such as, "Neither in a class war nor in a military war, will you turn your guns on your fellow workers", and, "Turn your weapons on your oppressors." The question of whether to charge editor John Ross Campbell with incitement to mutiny became a controversial issue known as the Campbell Case.[46][47]
  • Greece announced it was expelling 50,000 Armenians from the country.[33]
  • American League President Ban Johnson ordered umpires to speed up baseball games by cutting short trivial arguments about balls and strikes as well as preventing players from taking too much time inspecting balls on suspicion they'd been tampered with.[48]

July 26, 1924 (Saturday)

July 27, 1924 (Sunday)

July 28, 1924 (Monday)

July 29, 1924 (Tuesday)

July 30, 1924 (Wednesday)

July 31, 1924 (Thursday)

  • The reparations commission released a report estimating that Germany had only paid about half the amounts that the French, Belgians and English demanded for occupying the Rhineland and Ruhr.[54]
  • Died: Prince Francis Joseph of Battenberg, 62

References

  1. ^ "U.S. Embassy Flag Cut Down by Japanese".  
  2. ^ a b "Japan Regrets Theft of Flag of U.S. Embassy".  
  3. ^ Henning, Arthur Sears (July 2, 1924). "Gov. Smith and Davis Gain in Later Voting".  
  4. ^ Steele, John (July 3, 1924). "Radio Beam Ray to Speed Work and Cut Rates".  
  5. ^ "Italian Border Patrol Kills 2 Serb Soldiers".  
  6. ^ "Castro, Ex-Premier, in Duel".  
  7. ^ Matheson, Roderick (July 4, 1924). "Jail Japanese Youth Who Stole Embassy Flag".  
  8. ^ Steele, John (July 4, 1924). "Link Up Nation's Power Plants, Hoover Urges".  
  9. ^ "New Political Group Gathers for Convention".  
  10. ^ Steele, John (July 5, 1924). "Kitty Snatches Wimbledon Title from Our Helen".  
  11. ^ "Coolidge Son Gravely Ill of Poisoning".  
  12. ^ Wales, Henry (July 6, 1924). "30,000 Cheer as Olympic Games Formally Open".  
  13. ^ Guttmann, Allen (1992). The Olympics: A History of the Modern Games. Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press. p. 38.  
  14. ^ "Americans Win Two Titles in Tennis Finals at Wimbledon".  
  15. ^ Nohlen, D (2005) Elections in the Americas: A data handbook, Volume I, p471 ISBN 978-0-19-928357-6
  16. ^ a b c Lennox, Doug (2009). Now You Know: Big Book of Sports. Toronto: Magnetawan Communications, Inc. and Dundurn Press Ltd. pp. 232–233.  
  17. ^ Ewing, Donald (July 8, 1924). "Death Takes Coolidge's Son".  
  18. ^ Henning, Arthur Sears (July 8, 1924). "Smith Leads McAdoo; Dark Horse May Win Today".  
  19. ^ Day, Donald (July 9, 1924). "Denounce U.S. Immigrant Law at Red Congress".  
  20. ^ Henning, Arthur Sears (July 10, 1924). "Party Unites, But M'Adoo Leaders Sulk".  
  21. ^ Tucker, Garland S. (2010). The High Tide of American Conservatism: Davis, Coolidge, and the 1924 Election. Austin, Texas: Emerald Book Company. pp. 95–96.  
  22. ^ "1924 Presidential Election". 270 To Win. Retrieved January 16, 2015. 
  23. ^ Ewing, Donald (July 10, 1924). "Funeral for Calvin Solemn as a Prince's".  
  24. ^ a b "Here's the Complete Log of the Flyers Round the World".  
  25. ^ Ewing, Donald (July 11, 1924). "Calvin Buried; First Lady a Brave Mother".  
  26. ^ Grieves, Forest L. (1974). International law, organization, and the environment. University of Arizona Press. p. 41. 
  27. ^ Clayton, John (July 13, 1924). "Yankee Airmen in Bucharest".  
  28. ^ "Kleenex". Trademarkia. Retrieved January 16, 2015. 
  29. ^ Gmür, Leonhard (2013). Rex Ingram: Hollywood's Rebel of the Silver Screen. Berlin: epubli GmbH. p. 45.  
  30. ^ "Fires Sweep Pacific Coast".  
  31. ^ Wales, Henry (July 15, 1924). "Paris Cheers Yankee Flyers on World Trip".  
  32. ^ a b "Chronology 1924". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved January 16, 2015. 
  33. ^ a b c Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 320.  
  34. ^ "Army Reaches Limit and Recruiting is Stopped by Order".  
  35. ^ "July 17, 1924 Boston Braves at St. Louis Cardinals".  
  36. ^ Basil, H. (July 19, 1924). "U.S. Consul Slain in Persia".  
  37. ^ Zirinsky, Michael (1986). "Blood, Power and Hypocrisy: The Murder of Robert Imbrie and American Relations with Pahlavi Iran, 1924".  
  38. ^ "Wheeler Joins La Follette; to War on Dawes".  
  39. ^ Basil, H. (July 21, 1924). "Martial Law in Tehran; Due to Murder of Yank".  
  40. ^ Forbes, Genevieve (July 22, 1924). "Young Killers Plead Guilty; Ask for Mercy".  
  41. ^ a b c Hannon, Michael (May 2010). "Leopold and Loeb Case (1924)" (PDF). University of Minnesota Law Library. Retrieved January 16, 2015. 
  42. ^ Skene, Don (July 23, 1924). "France Enraged Over Slurs on Olympics".  
  43. ^ Murazumi, Mie (2000). "Japan's Laws on Dual Nationality in the Context of a Globalized World" (PDF). University of Washington. Retrieved January 16, 2015. 
  44. ^ "20 Children Die, 17 Injured in Panic at Movie".  
  45. ^ Newman, Harry (July 25, 1924). "Tunney Stops Carpentier Amid Riot in 15th Round".  
  46. ^ James Klugmann, History of the Communist Party of Great Britain: Volume One: Formation and Early Years, 1919–1924. London: Lawrence and Wishart, 1968. Pages 366–367.
  47. ^ Dobson, Jeremy (2009). Why Do the People Hate Me So?: The Strange Interlude Between the Two Great Wars in the Britain of Stanley Baldwin. Leicester: Troubador Publishing Ltd. p. 102.  
  48. ^ "Ban Orders A.L. Umps to Speed Up Ball Games".  
  49. ^ Wilma, David (September 22, 1999). "Ku Klux Klan stages huge rally in Issaquah on July 26, 1924". Historylink. Retrieved January 16, 2015. 
  50. ^ "Yanks Get Lion's Share of Prizes as Olympic Games End".  
  51. ^ "Nashville Puts Chicago to Air Mail to Test".  
  52. ^ Slusser, Robert M.; Triska, Jan F. (1959). A Calendar of Soviet Treaties, 1917–1957. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press. p. 46. 
  53. ^ "The U.S. Flyers".  
  54. ^ Wales, Henry (August 1, 1924). "Cost of Allied Rhine Army Eats Up Reparations".  
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