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American Samoan general election, 2010

 

American Samoan general election, 2010

This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
American Samoa

The American Samoan general election of 2010 will take place on November 2, 2010.[1] The deadline to register as a candidate for the election is set as September 1, 2010.[1]

Voters in American Samoa will choose the 20 elected members of the American Samoa House of Representatives.[1] Voters will also cast their ballot for the federal Delegate to the United States House of Representatives in Washington D.C and proposed revisions to the American Samoan Constitution.[1]

Contents

  • American Samoa House of Representatives 1
  • Revisions to Constitution of American Samoa 2
  • Delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives 3
  • References 4

American Samoa House of Representatives

Voters chose 20 elected members of the American Samoa House of Representatives.[1][2] Six incumbent representatives lost their re-election bids.[2]

Revisions to Constitution of American Samoa

Voters will decide if the amendments and revisions to the Constitution of American Samoa which were proposed at the 2010 Constitutional Convention should be adopted.[1] The government will announce how many new amendments to the Constitution will be presented to the territory's voters as the election nears.[1]

Voters strongly rejected the proposed amendments to the Constitution, with 7,660 (70.17%) voting against the changes to 3,257 (29.83%) who voted yes.[3] Voters rejected the amendments to the Constitution in all 17 electoral districts of American Samoa as well as in the absentee ballot poll.[3]

Delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives

Voters will also choose American Samoa's delegate to the United States House of Representatives, who holds office for a two year term. Incumbent Eni Faleomavaega won re-election to a 12th, two-year term.

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "American Samoa’s Chief Election Officer announces general election date".  
  2. ^ a b Sagapolutele, Fili (2010-11-03). "Local House race results hold some surprises".  
  3. ^ a b Fili Sagapolutele (November 3, 2010). "Voters strongly reject constitutional revisions".  
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