World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Aphrodite (album)

Article Id: WHEBN0027034258
Reproduction Date:

Title: Aphrodite (album)  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Kylie Minogue, Closer, Keane (band), Can't Get You Out of My Head, Love at First Sight (Kylie Minogue song), Hot Dance Club Songs, Tim Rice-Oxley, Aphrodite (disambiguation), Slow (song), Stuart Price
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Aphrodite (album)

Aphrodite
Kylie Minogue
Released 5 July 2010 (2010-07-05)
Recorded 2009–10
Genre
Length 43:21
Label Parlophone
Producer
Kylie Minogue chronology

X
(2007)
Aphrodite
(2010)
Singles from Aphrodite
  1. "All the Lovers"
    Released: 28 June 2010
  2. "Get Outta My Way"
    Released: 27 September 2010
  3. "Better Than Today"
    Released: 3 December 2010
  4. "Put Your Hands Up (If You Feel Love)"
    Released: 29 May 2011

Aphrodite is the eleventh studio album by Australian recording artist Kylie Minogue, released on 5 July 2010 by her record label Parlophone. Released following her tenth studio album X, Aphrodite was billed as Minogue's comeback album and is primarily a dance-pop and disco record, with influences ranging from synthpop to club music. British electronic music producer Stuart Price was enlisted as the executive producer of the album and his role was critical in shaping the album's sound and deciding the tracklist. Price also handled the mixing of the songs to ensure that they felt like they were a part of the same album. Aphrodite marked the first time Minogue enlisted an executive producer for a studio album. Producers and writers on the album include Jake Shears, Calvin Harris, Nerina Pallot, Sebastien Ingrosso and Pascal Gabriel.

Four singles were released to promote Aphrodite. Its lead single "All the Lovers" was a commercial success, peaking at number two in the United Kingdom and reaching the top ten in numerous countries like France, Italy, Scotland and Spain. In Australia, it peaked at number 13 on the singles chart and narrowly missed the top ten. "Get Outta My Way" was released as the second single and reached the top 20 in the United Kingdom, but underperformed in Australia and wasn't able to peak inside the top 50. Similarly, the third single "Better Than Today" also missed the top 50 in Australia, and even the top 20 in the United Kingdom. After the poor chart performance of the last two singles, Minogue expressed disappointment in her label and confirmed that no further single releases would follow. Despite this statement, "Put Your Hands Up (If You Feel Love)" was released as the fourth and final single from Aphrodite and managed to peak at number 50 in Australia. In the United States, all four singles released from the album peaked atop the Billboard Hot Dance Club Songs chart.

Upon its release, Aphrodite was met with generally positive reviews from music critics, many of whom complimented it as a return to form for Minogue. However, critics were divided on the production of the album; many felt Price's production helped in making the album cohesive, while some felt it made the album sound too similar to Minogue's previous work and lacked innovation. Commercially, Aphrodite was a success. In Minogue's native country Australia, it peaked at number two on the Australian Albums chart, and was later certified platinum by the Australian Recording Industry Association for shipments of 70,000 units. In the United Kingdom, the album debuted at number one on the UK Albums chart, a feat accomplished by Minogue's debut studio album Kylie (1988) during the same week 22 years ago. Aphrodite was the fourth studio album by Minogue to peak atop the UK albums chart and made her the first solo artist to have a number one album in four different decades in the region, achieving this in the 1980s, 1990s, 2000s and 2010s. She also became a Guinness World Record-holder for achieving the most consecutive decades with top five albums in the United Kingdom. The British Phonographic Industry certified Aphrodite platinum for shipments of 300,000 units. Elsewhere, the album reached the top-five in countries like Belgium, France, Greece, Spain and Switzerland. In the United States, it became Minogue's second-highest-charting album in the region by peaking at number 19 on the Billboard 200 chart. To promote the album, Minogue embarked on the Aphrodite: Les Folies Tour in 2011.

Background and production

"I think it was important for us to make a record that sounded like it was a moment in time, that came from the same place, from the same voice, from the same heart. This was the time capsule. Having it all in one spot just gave it the cohesive sound that we wanted from the start."

Stuart Price, on serving as the executive producer of Aphrodite[1]

Following her recovery from breast cancer, Minogue released her tenth studio album X in 2007.[2] Slated to be released as Minogue's comeback album,[3] X went platinum in her native-country Australia[4] after it debuted at number one on the Australian Albums chart.[5] In the United Kingdom, the album entered and peaked at number four on the UK Albums Chart[6] and was eventually certified platinum.[7] Critical reception towards X was generally favourable, but many critics felt that it lacked introspection from Minogue's side.[2] Further, its status as Minogue's comeback album was dismissed following its release.[8][9]

Soon, Minogue began working on her eleventh studio album Aphrodite. Grammy award-winning British electronic music producer Stuart Price was enlisted as the executive producer of the album.[10] Price had previously served as the executive producer of American recording artist Madonna's tenth studio album Confessions on a Dance Floor (2005), and international news agency Reuters regarded him as "one of the most in-demand pop producers".[11] In an interview with music website Popjustice, Price revealed that he got involved in the production of Aphrodite after he met Minogue for a writing session in October 2009.[12] As executive producer, Price was responsible for "shaping the album’s sound", deciding the tracklist for the album, and mixing the songs in order to ensure that they "feel like they’re part of the same album".[12] Popjustice commented that every song on the album has "gone through a bit of a Stuart Price filter so that it doesn't sound like some dickhead [sic] A&R has just aimlessly scooped a load of tracks off a shelf".[12] Aphrodite marked the first time Minogue enlisted an executive producer, and discussing her experience, she said "It was just the best experience, and funnily enough I think it's the most cohesive album I've had since the beginning of my career, back in the PWL days, where by its very nature made it cohesive. There's a lot to be said for working with different producers and trying different stuff which has worked really well for me in the past but I definitely wanted someone to tie this together as Stuart has done so beautifully [...] so that it existed as a real body of work".[1] Minogue and Price subjected songs on Aphrodite to a "Parton Test", as they "knew a song would work if it made sense when sung in the style of Dolly Parton".[12] Collaborators on the album include Jake Shears, male lead singer of American pop group Scissor Sisters, Scottish disc jockey Calvin Harris, married British record producer couple Nerina Pallot and Andy Chatterley, Swedish disc jockey Sebastien Ingrosso and Belgian musician Pascal Gabriel.[13]

Songs

"All the Lovers" (2010)
noicon
A 19 second sample of lead-single "All the Lovers", containing part of the chorus, which critics described as "lovely arms-in-the-air" and "anthemic".[14][15]

"Get Outta My Way" (2010)
noicon
A 20 second sample of the last chorus of "Get Outta My Way", in which Minogue delivers "wispy vocals and very suggestive lyrics".[16]

Problems playing these files? See media help.

Billed by her record label Parlophone as her comeback album,[8][9] Aphrodite is a celebration of Minogue's "dance-floor roots",[17] and is primarily a dance-pop and disco album.[11] "All the Lovers", one of the last tracks to be written for the album,[17] is a midtempo "squiggly" synthpop song written by Jim Eliot and Mima Stilwell.[13][18] It is similar to Minogue's 2004 single "I Believe in You", but has a "more danceable edge", and features a "gauzy, heartbeat rhythm and swirling, ‘80s-era synth lines".[12][14][19] The song was met with critical acclaim from music critics, receiving a perfect five star rating from both Nick Levine of Digital Spy and Fraser McAlpine of BBC UK; the former labelled it a "shimmering midtempo electro-disco tune",[14] while the latter praised its "elegiac" chorus and Minogue's vocal delivery, commenting that she is "busy dispensing healing power rays from her golden throat".[20]

"Get Outta My Way" is an electronic-disco track written by Daniel Davidsen, Damon Sharpe, Lucas Secon, Mich Hansen and Peter Wallevik,[21] with influences of bubblegum pop.[16] The song focuses on a "frustrated and furious" Minogue delivering "wispy vocals and very suggestive lyrics" in a form of a warning to her uncaring partner, indicating that she may leave him and start "grinding away with another chap".[16][22][23] Lucas Secon, in an interview with international music industry publication HitQuarters, revealed that the record "wasn’t aimed specifically at her (Minogue). It was just a good dance record, but obviously, it fitted into what she wanted to do. I just do tracks and whatever happens to fit, fits".[24] The song received generally favourable reviews from music critics. Nima Baniamer from Contactmusic.com complimented Minogue's involvement in the song and called it a "flamboyant explosion of pop, synth and dance" and "perfect guilty pleasure",[16] while Mayer Nissim from Digital Spy commended its subject matter, noting it to be perfect for a "bouncy and unpretentious instant disco-pop classic".[23]

"Put Your Hands Up (If You Feel Love)" is a hi-NRG-influenced club song,[19] written by Miriam Nervo, Olivia Nervo, and Fin Dow-Smith.[25] It received mixed reviews from critics; Caroline Sullivan from The Guardian felt that the lyrics of the song were clichéd,[26] while Jordan Richardson from Blog Critics named it a "concert hit waiting to happen".[27] "Closer", written by Price and Beatrice Heatherley, is one of the darker tracks in Aphrodite, and features "sighing background vocals and spiralling harpsichord-esque synths".[13] Critics felt that it was one of the more interesting and experimental songs of the album.[8][9] "Everything is Beautiful" is a downtempo pop song penned by Tim Rice-Oxley and Fraser T Smith.[28] Although Price said that no ballads were included in the album,[12] critics found the track the "mellowest"[29] track on Aphrodite and its "only truly softer offering".[19] Mikael Wood from the Entertainment Weekly called the track Minogue's "only misstep" on Aphrodite, writing it off as a "snoozy ballad".[30]


"Aphrodite", the title track of the album, is a nineties-influenced dance-pop song which features a "foot-stomping" beat and "military drummed" instrumentation, similar to that of a marching band.[29][31][32] The song, written by Nerina Pallot and Andy Chatterley,[33] is penned like a dance anthem through which Minogue "brags" about her sexual prowess; she warns that she is not a person meant to be confronted and angered.[34][35] The song was met with critical acclaim by most music critics, and was declared to be one of the strongest tracks on the album.[9][13][31][36] "Illusion" is a melancholic song written by Minogue and Price.[13][37] Jon O'Brien from AllMusic felt that the song was insignificant, calling it "disposable".[38] "Better Than Today", another track written by Pallot and Chatterley, is a "breezy summertime" pop song with influences of electropop and country music.[13][29] Critical reception towards the song varied from positive to mixed. Mikael Wood from the Entertainment Weekly picked it as a standout,[30] and Nick Levine from Digital Spy complimented the song's likeability, noting it to be "sweet, seductive and pretty much impossible not to succumb to over and over again".[39] Fraser McAlpine from BBC UK, however, felt that the song was a little monotonous.[40]

"Too Much", a rave-influenced[29] disco and synthpop track written by Minogue, Jake Shears, and Calvin Harris,[41] is a "fugue of synths and disco-rific sampled strings".[42] Critics were divided on the track; Sophia Money-Coutts from The National found it "unexciting" and criticized it for being an example of Harris' usual style of production,[8] whereas Christel Loar from PopMatters praised its energy and named it the track "to beat for overall addictiveness".[19] Luciana Caporaso, Sebastian Ingrosso, Nick Clow and Magnus Lidehall contribute the dance-rock song "Cupid Boy",[43] which finds influences from English alternative rock band New Order and features Minogue delivering "lusty" vocals over a "retro, throbbing bass line".[19][42] It received positive reviews from critics. Neil McCormick from The Daily Telegraph appreciated its intro and "almost New Order" bass line,[44] and Nick Levine from Digital Spy deemed it a stand out, selecting its rock guitar instrumentation as one of the album's "distinguishing sonic details".[45]

"Looking for an Angel", one of the first songs Minogue and Price wrote together,[1] is composed of "celestial synth strings" and contains a "heavenly extended breakdown".[13][45] MuuMuse editor and publisher Bradley Stern was positive towards the song and said it "functions as nothing short of definitions of the word "lush"",[31] while Sal Cinquemani from Slant Magazine was critical of Price's production.[46] "Can't Beat the Feeling", the album's closing track, is an electropop song written by Børge Fjordheim, Hannah Robinson, Matt Prime, Pascal Gabriel and Richard X,[47] and is similar to the work of French electronic music duo Daft Punk.[29] Critics were positive towards the song; Tim Sendra from AllMusic named it a "shimmering and funky track",[13] and Christel Loar from PopMatters appreciated its placement as the closing track on the album, commented that it "pumps up the pulse again for one final push into electro-pop bliss".[19]

Release and promotion

Aphrodite was released worldwide on 5 July 2010, in digital download, standard CD, and vinyl formats.[49] A special "Experience Edition" CD, which contains a 28 page booklet, unseen footage from Minogue’s 2009 For You, For Me tour, behind the scenes footage of the promotional photo and video shoots of the album, an exclusive interview, and a previously unreleased bonus track entitled "Mighty Rivers", was also released on the same day.[49] The artwork of the album captures Minogue "transformed into a goddess" as she is dressed in a dark blue, metal-adorned, silk muslin gown, taken from French fashion designer Jean Paul Gaultier's spring-summer 2010 haute couture collection.[48] Gaultier had previously designed the costumes for Minogue's KylieX2008 and For You, For Me tours.[48][50] On 6 July, Minogue celebrated the worldwide release of the album with a performance held at the Pacha Club at Ibiza, Spain.[51]

Singles

Four singles were released to promote Aphrodite. "All the Lovers" was released as its lead single in June 2010.[17] Explaining her decision to release it as the lead single, Minogue said that "as I was recording it I knew that "All The Lovers" had to be the first single; it sums up the euphoria of the album perfectly. It gives me goose-bumps, so I'm really excited to hear what everyone thinks of it".[17] Commercially, "All the Lovers" performed well, particularly in Europe. It peaked at number three on the UK Singles chart,[52] where it was later certified silver by the British Phonographic Industry (BPI) for shipments of 60,000 units.[7] The single also reached the top ten in France,[53] Italy,[54] where it was later certified gold,[55] Scotland,[56] and Spain, where it peaked atop the physical singles chart.[57] In Australia, "All the Lovers" missed peaking inside the top ten by reaching number 13 on the singles chart.[18] In this region, it was certified gold by the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) for shipments of 35,000 units.[58] In the United States, the song peaked at number one on the Billboard Hot Dance Club Songs chart.[59] An accompanying music video for the song was directed by Joseph Kahn and features Minogue singing the song, dressed in a white cobweb-style T-shirt worn over a black bra and knickers, while standing atop a mountain of lingerie-clad couples caressing each other.[60]

"Get Outta My Way" was released as the second single, on 27 September 2010.[61] While it was moderately successful in the United Kingdom, and reached number 14 on the UK Singles chart,[52] it was a commercial disappointment in Australia and only managed to peak at number 69 on the singles chart.[62] In the United States, the song peaked at number one on the Billboard Hot Dance Club Songs chart.[59] The accompanying music video, directed by AlexandLiane, features Minogue, and a number of male models, performing various dance routines wearing a gold chain mini dress, a red silk mini trench and an LBD.[63]


"Better Than Today" was released as the third single from the album, on 3 December 2010.[64] Although critics were generally favourable towards the song as a track on the album, some dismissed its release as a single.[65][66] The single was less successful than "All the Lovers" and "Get Outta My Way". It peaked at number 55 on the Australian singles chart,[67] and thus became the second single release from Aphrodite to miss charting inside the top 50. In the United Kingdom, it missed charting inside the top 20 by peaking at number 32 on the UK singles chart.[52] In the United States, the song became the third consecutive single release from the album to peak at number one on the Billboard Hot Dance Club Songs chart.[59] An old school arcade game-inspired music video was directed for the song by Minogue and her stylist William Baker.[68][69] Following the poor chart performance of "Get Outta My Way" and "Better Than Today", Minogue expressed disappointment in her record label Parlophone, saying:

"It's confusing. I felt a little let down with my releases from Aphrodite. I was caught out like a lot of artists were, with record companies figuring out how to do single releases these days. I remember doing a promo for one of the last singles and it just felt really old-fashioned. I'm pretty computer-savvy, something didn't feel right, but no one said anything to me. You get Britney releasing "Hold It Against Me" and Gaga's "Born This Way" available on iTunes the day you hear it first. That's how it should be. And there's me waiting for a mid-week chart figure like it's 1989."[70]

Although Minogue mentioned that "Better Than Today" would be the last single to be released from Aphrodite,[70] "Put Your Hands Up (If You Feel Love)" was released as the fourth and final single from the album, on 29 May 2011.[71] The single managed to reach the top 50 in Australia, peaking at number 50 on the singles chart.[25] It peaked at number one on on the Billboard Hot Dance Club Songs chart, thus becoming the fourth single from Aphrodite to peak atop the chart.[59] No official music video for the single was commissioned, but a lyrics video of a remix version of the song by Pete Hammond was released.[72]

Tour

To promote Aphrodite, Minogue embarked on the Aphrodite: Les Folies Tour, beginning in early 2011.[73] The tour was staged by the creative team behind Disneyland Resort's World of Color show, and the budget of the tour was reported to be around $25 million.[38] Concert shows were held at Europe, North America, Asia, Australia and Africa. Minogue's costumes and wardrobe was designed by her frequent collaborators Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana, owners of the Italian luxury industry fashion house Dolce and Gabbana.[74] The concert shows were spectacles "loosely based around Greek mythology".[38] The entire tracklist of the album, excluding only the song "Too Much", was included in the setlist of the tour; other songs were taken from Minogue's previous studio albums, such as Light Years (2000) and Fever (2001).[38] The tour was a commercial success, and ranked at number 21 on Pollstar's year-end "Top 25 Worldwide Tours" list, with a total gross of $52.8 million and ticket sales of 527,683 units.[75] A live album of the concert show held at the O2 Arena in London, was released as Aphrodite Les Folies: Live in London, on 7 June 2011.[38]

Critical reception

Professional ratings
Aggregate scores
Source Rating
Metacritic 67/100[76]
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4/5 stars[13]
Billboard 72/100[77]
Entertainment Weekly A-[30]
Los Angeles Times 2.5/5 stars[78]
MusicOMH 3.5/5 stars[79]
PopMatters 7/10[19]
Rolling Stone 3/5 stars[80]
Slant Magazine 2.5/5 stars[46]
Spin 8/10[81]

The album received generally positive reviews from music critics. At Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating out of 100 to reviews from mainstream critics, Aphrodite received an average score of 67 based on 21 reviews, indicating "generally favorable reviews".[76] Ben Norman from About.com appreciated Price's production, noting Aphrodite to be "more coherent and streamlined than X".[35] Although the critic mentioned that the songs do not provide the "immediate appeal", like those in X did, he labelled Aphrodite "another knockout hit album" from Minogue and the "Do Not Miss album of 2010".[35] Tim Sendra from AllMusic commended Minogue's choice of collaborators and producers, commenting that the album is the "work of someone who knows exactly what her skills are and who to hire to help showcase them to perfection".[13] He also appreciated the album's cohesion and commercial prospect, and named it "one of her best".[13] The Billboard review of the album complimented Price's "ability to create consistent sound without sacrificing each track's individuality", and termed Aphrodite a "journey cohesive, fun and fitting for a goddess".[42] Ian Wade from BBC Music gave the album an extremely positive review and found it to be an "astonishing return to form" for Minogue.[29] Wade commended her for returning to her roots and becoming the "Kylie of Fever and Light Years"; he concluded the review by calling Aphrodite an "all-killer, flags-aloft amazing triumph" and that "not liking this (album) would be like not being keen on breathing".[29] Nick Levine from Digital Spy felt that it was her best album since Fever and admitted that while Aphrodite isn't "deep", it "sure ain't dumb either", opining that is is meant to be heard for relaxation and enjoyment.[45] Mikael Wood praised the tracks' danceability and concluded that "The diminutive Australian diva is still delivering disco thunder from Down Under".[30] Priya Elan from NME felt that Price was the "perfect choice of musical partner" and complimented him for producing Minogue's "most unified work in ages".[36] Christel Loar from PopMatters found the album similar to Light Years and Fever and commended the production, opining that while "dance pop with this much gloss and unabashed glee is relegated to the realms of guilty pleasure", Aphrodite is "is that rare representation of perfect production that is just pleasure, pure and simple".[19] Rob Sheffield from Rolling Stone labelled the album Minogue's "finest work since 1997's underrated Impossible Princess".[80] Neil McCormick from The Daily Telegraph complimented Price for enlisting a "top notch" team of collaborators and termed Aphrodite a "mainstream pop blast".[44] Barry Walters from Spin commended Minogue for returning to her original style of music, saying "Finally even the suits realize that no one wants ersatz hip-hop or Americanized AOR from Australia's ultimate pop tart".[81]


However, many critics were displeased with Minogue's lack of innovation on Aphrodite. James Reed from The Boston Globe gave the album a negative review and criticized it for being too dated, commenting that its "release date is 2010, but its freshness seal is clearly stamped 2000 (circa Minogue's Light Years) [sic]".[82] He called the album Minogue's "least interesting work she’s made in a decade" and a "letdown", and concluded by saying that "simply being fabulous isn't enough".[82] Caroline Sullivan from The Guardian acknowledged the album's "sharp production", but commented that the album is "only as good as Kylie herself" and criticized it for being uninteresting "unless you happen to be on a dancefloor at 4am"; she concluded by saying that "Perhaps thinking outside the box – an acoustic album? – is what's needed next".[26] Margaret Wappler from the Los Angeles Times noted that "There aren't many new ideas here, just more of the old reliable" and commented that "Our midnight bird (Minogue) has been in the club for a long time, however, and it shows".[78] Helen Clarke from MusicOMH gave the album an overall positive review and appreciated Minogue for "just what she does, and somehow it works", but did mention that "her 11th album in 23 years, fails to quite hit the spot".[79] Sophia Money-Coutts from The National was not impressed with Minogue for bringing "the usual stuff about being completely herself on this album and how happy that has made her" and also criticized Price for not producing "anything ground-breaking here".[8] The critic was specifically negative towards "touting Aphrodite as a comeback on the level of Fever", because she felt it lacked new and diverse material from Minogue's previous efforts; she summed up by saying that "Criticising Kylie feels like swearing at the Dalai Lama, but this is a princess that needs a slight prod".[8] Jon Parales from The New York Times found the album too similar to the work of Madonna, especially her studio albums Like a Virgin (1984) and Ray of Light (1998), and commented that "No one’s asking for reality in this (Minogue's) pop bubble — just a little bit more innovation".[83] Kitty Empire from The Observer called the album "enjoyable" and complimented Price for "lending a sleek cohesion to the whole (album)", but opined that Aphrodite " lacks the depth and chutzpah of some of her rivals' efforts".[9] Sal Cinquemani gave the album a mixed review; he noted it to be "more stylistically coherent than the abovementioned albums" and predicted that it would "no doubt please longtime fans", but also criticized Price's "cheap" and "antiseptic" production, which he opined was the "total opposite of what's required for an artist like Minogue, whose squeaky-clean voice begs to be dirtied up, not shellacked".[46]

Accolades and recognition

In 2010, Aphrodite was nominated for "Best Pop Release" at the ARIA Music Awards, but lost to Sia Furler's We Are Born; Minogue was nominated for "Best Female Artist", but lost to Megan Washington.[84] Idolator included the album on their list of "10 Out Of ’10: Idolator’s Favorite Albums Of The Year" list, with critic Robbie Daw writing that "hooking up with producer Stuart Price turned out to be the perfect way for Kylie to give her already impressive career a fresh jolt" and that "Aphrodite pretty much was my Summer 2010".[85] Aphrodite finished at number 40 on music website Last.fm's "Best of 2010" list, which is compiled on the basis of amount of "scrobbles" an album gets on the site.[86]

Chart performance

On the chart date of 18 July 2010, Aphrodite debuted and peaked at number two on the Australian Albums chart, and stayed on the position for three weeks.[88] It spent a total of 15 weeks on the chart,[88] and by 2011, Aphrodite had been certified platinum by the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) for shipments of 70,000 units.[89]

In the United Kingdom, Aphrodite debuted at number one on UK Albums chart, on the chart date of 17 July 2010.[87] The same feat had been accomplished by Minogue's debut studio album Kylie (1988) during the same week 22 years ago.[90] Aphrodite was the fourth studio album by Minogue to peak at number one in the region, behind Kylie, Enjoy Yourself (1989), and Fever, and her tenth studio album to chart within the top 10.[90] Following this, Minogue released a statement saying "I've been completely overwhelmed by the reaction to Aphrodite and to hear that the album has gone to number one is the most amazing news. I am ecstatic!"[90] The album spent one week at number one and a total of 29 weeks in the top 40 of the chart.[52] In April 2011, Aphrodite was certified platinum by the British Phonographic Industry for shipments of 300,000 units.[7] Minogue became a Guinness World Record-holder for achieving the most consecutive decades with top five albums in the United Kingdom (for a female artist).[91] She also became the first solo artist to have a number one album in four different decades in the United Kingdom, 1980s, 1990s, 2000s and 2010s.[92]

In Austria, the album entered and peaked at number three on the Austrian Albums charts and stayed on the chart for a total of 10 weeks.[93] In the Dutch-speaking Flanders region of Belgium, it entered the Ultratop chart at number six and peaked at number four, spending a total of 12 weeks on the chart.[94] It was more successful in the French-speaking Wallonia region of the country, where it entered the Ultratop chart at number 11 and peaked at number three, spending a total of 16 weeks on the chart.[95] In Belgium, Aphrodite was certified gold by the Belgian Entertainment Association (BEA) for sales of 10,000 units.[96] In France, the album entered and peaked at number three on the French Albums chart, and spent a total of 23 weeks on the chart.[97] Similarly, in Germany, it entered and peaked at number three on the German Albums chart, spending a total of two weeks on the chart.[98] In Greece, Aphrodite entered the Greek Albums chart at number 28 and peaked at number one, spending a total of seven weeks on the chart.[99] It is Minogue's only album to chart in the region.[100] In Spain, the album entered the Spanish Albums chart at number three and peaked at number two, spending a total of 37 weeks on the chart and becoming Minogue's highest charting album in the region.[101] In Switzerland, Aphrodite entered and peaked at number two on the Swiss Albums, spending a total of 13 weeks on the chart.[102]

In Canada, Aphrodite became Minogue's highest charting album yet by peaking at number eight on the Billboard Canadian Albums chart.[103] In the United States, the album peaked at number 19 on the Billboard 200 chart, spending a total of three weeks on the chart.[104] It marked Minogue's second-highest-charting album in the region, behind only Fever, which peaked at number three.[105] It also debuted and peaked at number one on the Billboard European Albums chart,[106] and at number two on the Top Electronic Albums chart.[107]

Track listing

No. TitleWriter(s)Producer(s) Length
1. "All the Lovers"   3:20
2. "Get Outta My Way"  
  • Peter Wallevik
3:38
3. "Put Your Hands Up (If You Feel Love)"   3:37
4. "Closer"   extra4 = Price  3:09
5. "Everything Is Beautiful"  Smith 3:25
6. "Aphrodite"   3:45
7. "Illusion"  Price 3:21
8. "Better Than Today"   3:25
9. "Too Much"  Harris 3:16
10. "Cupid Boy"   4:26
11. "Looking for an Angel"  Price 3:49
12. "Can't Beat the Feeling"   4:09
Total length:
43:21

Les Folies Tour Edition

On 28 June 2011, a three disc remix collection of Aphrodite, titled the Les Folies Tour Edition, was released.[113] It contains remixes of the original songs by various producers such as Pete Hammond, Denzal Park, Muscles, and Bimbo Jones.[113]

Disc 1
No. TitleWriter(s)Producer(s) Length
1. "All the Lovers"   3:20
2. "Get Outta My Way"  
  • Peter Wallevik
3:38
3. "Put Your Hands Up (If You Feel Love)"   3:37
4. "Closer"  Price 3:09
5. "Everything Is Beautiful"  Smith 3:25
6. "Aphrodite"   3:45
7. "Illusion"  Price 3:21
8. "Better Than Today"   3:25
9. "Too Much"  Harris 3:16
10. "Cupid Boy"   4:26
11. "Looking for an Angel"  Price 3:49
12. "Can't Beat the Feeling"   4:09

Personnel

Credits for Aphrodite adapted from liner notes.[114]

Charts

Certifications

See also

References

External links

  • BlackBook magazine interview with Kylie Minogue
  • Kylie Minogue: Special K – Billboard interview with Kylie Minogue
  • The Times interview with Kylie Minogue
  • Out interview with Kylie Minogue
  • CNN interview with Kylie Minogue
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.