Andrology

Andrologist
Occupation
Names Doctor, Medical Specialist
Occupation type
Specialty
Activity sectors
Medicine
Description
Education required
Doctor of Medicine, Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine

Andrology (from Ancient Greek: ἀνήρ, anēr, genitive ἀνδρός, andros, "man"; and -λογία, -logia) is the medical specialty that deals with male health, particularly relating to the problems of the male reproductive system and urological problems that are unique to men. It is also known as "The science of Men". It is the counterpart to gynaecology, which deals with medical issues which are specific to the female reproductive system. However unlike gynaecology, which has a plethora of medical board certification program worldwide, andrology has none.[1] Andrology has only been studied as a distinct specialty since the late 1960s: the first specialist journal on the subject was the German periodical Andrologie (now called Andrologia), published from 1969 onwards.[2]

Male-specific medical and surgical procedures include Vasectomy, Vasovasostomy (one of the vasectomy reversal procedures), Orchidopexy and Circumcision as well as intervention to deal with male genitourinary disorders such as the following:

Human Male Anatomy

See also

Notes

  1. ^ http://www.dontcookyourballs.com/boost/doctors
  2. ^ Social Studies of Science (1990) 20, p. 32

External links

  • American Society of Andrology
  • British Andrology Society
  • International Society of Andrology
  • Andrology Australia
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