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Andy Gardiner

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Title: Andy Gardiner  
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Subject: Florida Legislature, Eric Eisnaugle, Darren Soto, Thad Altman, Dorothy Hukill
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Andy Gardiner

Andy Gardiner
President of the Florida Senate
Assumed office
November 18, 2014
Preceded by Don Gaetz
Member of the Florida Senate
from the 13th district
Assumed office
November 20, 2012
Preceded by Dennis Jones
Member of the Florida Senate
from the 9th district
In office
November 2008 – November 2012
Preceded by Daniel Webster
Succeeded by Audrey Gibson
Member of the Florida House of Representatives
from the 40th district
In office
November 2000 – November 2008
Preceded by Bill Sublette
Succeeded by Eric Eisnaugle
Personal details
Born (1969-01-23) January 23, 1969
Orlando, Florida, U.S.
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Camille Gardiner
Children Andrew
Joanna
Kathryn
Alma mater Stetson University
Religion Methodism

Andy Gardiner (born January 23, 1969, in Orlando, Florida) is a Republican member of the Florida Senate, representing the 13th District, which includes parts of Brevard County and Orange County, since 2012.

Gardiner attended Stetson University, where he graduated with degrees in political science and psychology in 1992, and has worked for Orlando Health as the Vice-President of External Affairs and Community Relations.

When Republican State Representative Bill Sublette was unable to seek another term due to term limits, Gardiner ran to succeed him. He won the nomination of the Republican Party uncontested and defeated Democratic nominee Stuart Buchanan in the general election, in which he won 54% of the vote. In 2002, Gardiner was re-elected against Libertarian candidate Jack Conway in a landslide, receiving 78% of the vote, and he was re-elected without opposition in 2004. For the 2004 to 2006 legislative session, Gardiner served as the Majority Leader of the Florida House of Representatives. In 2006, Gardiner was re-elected against Darren Soto, the Democratic nominee, who would later go on to serve with Gardiner in the legislature.

When Republican State Senator Daniel Webster was unable to seek re-election in the 9th District, which included parts of Orange County, Osceola County, and Seminole County, due to term limits, Gardiner defeated Darius Davis, a teacher and the Democratic nominee, with 58% of the vote to win the seat. During the 2010 to 2012 legislative session, Gardiner was elected to serve as the Majority Leader of the Florida Senate. When the Senate districts were reconfigured in 2012, Gardiner was redistricted into the 13th District, which included most of his previous territory, so he ran for re-election there. He faced Orlando attorney Christopher Pennington, who was the Democratic nominee, in the general election. Gardiner was endorsed by Orlando Sentinel, who praised him as a "staunch fiscal and social conservative, but not a shrill partisan like some other party leaders."[1] In the end, he defeated Pennington with 55% of the vote.

Andy Gardiner has been selected five times by the Orlando Magazine's 50 Most Powerful People (2010, 2008, 2007, 2006, and 2005) [2] and named Orlando Business Journal’s Forty Under Forty Outstanding Male of the Year in 2005.[3]

External links

  • Florida Senate - Andy Gardiner
  • Florida House of Representatives - Andy Gardiner
  • Andy Gardiner for State Senate

References

  1. ^ http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/opinion/os-ed-endorse-senate-orange-100212-20121001,0,7876705.story
  2. ^ http://www.orlandomagazine.com/Orlando-Magazine/July-2010/50-Most-Powerful/
  3. ^ http://www.bizjournals.com/orlando/stories/2005/06/27/focus3.html
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