World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Australian pop music awards

Article Id: WHEBN0020542445
Reproduction Date:

Title: Australian pop music awards  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Australian popular music, Australian music industry, Australian music awards, Go-Set
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Australian pop music awards

Australian pop music awards are a series of inter-related national awards that gave recognition to popular musical artists and have included the Go-Set pop poll (1966–1972); TV Week King of Pop Awards (1967–1978);[1][2][3] TV Week and Countdown Music Awards (1979–1980); and Countdown Music and Video Awards (1981–1986).[4] Early awards were based on popular voting from readers of teenage pop music newspaper Go-Set and television program guide TV Week.[1][3] They were followed by responses from viewers of Countdown, a TV pop music series (1974–1987) on national broadcaster Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC).[5][6] Some of the later award ceremonies incorporated listed nominees and peer-voted awards.[7] From 1987 the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) instituted its own peer-voted ARIA Music Awards.[8]

Contents

  • 1966–1972:Go-Set pop poll results 1
    • 1966 1.1
    • 1967 1.2
    • 1968 1.3
    • 1969 1.4
    • 1970 1.5
    • 1971 1.6
    • 1972 1.7
  • 1967–1978: King of Pop Awards 2
    • 1967 2.1
    • 1968 2.2
    • 1969 2.3
    • 1970 2.4
    • 1971 2.5
    • 1972 2.6
    • 1973 2.7
    • 1974 2.8
    • 1975 2.9
    • 1976 2.10
    • 1977 2.11
    • 1978 2.12
  • 1979–1980: TV Week/Countdown Music Awards 3
    • 1979 3.1
    • 1980 3.2
  • 1981–1986: Countdown Music and Video Awards 4
    • 1981 4.1
    • 1982 4.2
    • 1983 4.3
    • 1984 4.4
    • 1985 4.5
    • 1986 4.6
  • Notes 5
  • References 6

1966–1972:Go-Set pop poll results

Go-Set Awards
Country Australia
Presented by Go-Set
First awarded 1966
Last awarded 1972

Teen-oriented pop music newspaper, Go-Set was established in February 1966 and conducted an annual poll during 1966 to 1972 of its readers to determine the most popular personalities.[3][6] Readers were provided with coupons to vote for their choice, with initial categories of 'Male Vocal', 'Female Vocal' and 'Group' for both Australian and International acts – in later years new categories were introduced and old categories renamed or retired.[9]

1966

Printed in Go-Set on 5 October 1966, pages 12 & 13.[9]

1967

Printed in Go-Set on 9 August 1967, pages 12 & 13.[9] Categories were renamed, e.g. Male Vocal became Top Male Singer.

1968

Printed in Go-Set on 19 June 1968, pages 12 & 13.[9]

1969

Printed in Go-Set on 28 June 1969, pages 10 & 12.[9] Categories back to original names, e.g. Top Male Singer returns to Male Vocal.

1970

Printed in Go-Set on 11 July 1970, pages 6 & 7.[9] New categories introduced: Guitarist, Drummer, Composer.[9] Ceremony for the Australian acts was held at Dallas Brooks Hall, East Melbourne, and was broadcast on 30 June by Seven Network.[9]
Australian acts: pop poll results
Position Male Girl Group Guitarist Drummer Composer
1 Johnny Farnham Allison Durbin The Masters Apprentices Doug Ford Colin Burgess Johnny Young
2 Russell Morris Wendy Saddington Axiom Ricky Springfield John Dien Jim Keays, Doug Ford
3 Ronnie Burns Colleen Hewett New Dream Billy Green Rick Brewer Hans Poulsen
4 Alex Kadell Liv Maessen Town Criers Rod Harris Stewie Speers Russell Morris
5 Normie Rowe Yvonne Barrett Zoot Glenn Wheatley Chris Easterby Ricky Springfield
International acts: pop poll results
Position Male Girl Group Guitarist Drummer Composer
1 Tom Jones Mary Hopkin The Beatles Eric Clapton Ringo Starr Paul McCartney
2 Elvis Presley Lulu Led Zeppelin Jimmy Page Ginger Baker John Lennon, Paul McCartney
3 Paul McCartney Diana Ross Creedence Clearwater Revival Jose Feliciano John Bonham John Lennon
4 Donovan Julie Driscoll The Rolling Stones George Harrison Keith Moon Bob Dylan
5 Glen Campbell Cilla Black The Hollies Paul McCartney Micky Dolenz Jimmy Webb

1971

Printed in Go-Set on 10 July 1971, pages 2 & 3.[9] New categories introduced: Best Album, Best Single, Best Bass Guitarist.[9]
Australian acts: pop poll results
Position Best Male Vocal Best Girl Vocal Best Group Best Guitarist Best Drummer Best Songwriter / Composer Best Album Best Single Best Bass Guitarist
1 Johnny Farnham Allison Durbin Daddy Cool Ricky Springfield Colin Burgess Russell Morris Choice CutsThe Masters Apprentices "Eleanor Rigby" – Zoot Glenn Wheatley
2 Russell Morris Liv Maessen The Masters Apprentices Doug Ford Rick Brewer Johnny Young Natural HighHans Poulsen "Eagle Rock" – Daddy Cool" Beeb Birtles
3 Ronnie Burns Colleen Hewett Zoot Phil Manning Gary Young Hans Poulsen VirgoRonnie Burns "Mr. America" – Russell Morris Wayne Duncan
4 Ted Mulry Wendy Saddington Chain Ross Hannaford Mark Kennedy Ricky Springfield The Hoax Is OverBilly Thorpe & the Aztecs "Black & Blue" – Chain Barry Sullivan
5 Hans Poulsen Jenny Johnson Spectrum Denis Wilson Barry Harvey Jim Keays, Doug Ford Spectrum Part OneSpectrum "I'll Be Gone" – Spectrum Duncan McGuire
International acts: pop poll results
Position Best Male Vocal Best Girl Vocal Best Group Best Guitarist Best Drummer Best Songwriter / Composer Best Album Best Bass Guitarist
1 Elvis Presley Janis Joplin Creedence Clearwater Revival Eric Clapton Ringo Starr Paul McCartney George Harrison Paul McCartney
2 Tom Jones Melanie The Rolling Stones George Harrison Ginger Baker George Harrison Mad Dogs and EnglishmenJoe Cocker Stu Cook
3 Joe Cocker Mary Hopkin Patridge Family Jimmy Page Doug Clifford John Lennon PendulumCreedence Clearwater Revival Andy Fraser
4 Elton John Freda Payne Deep Purple John Fogerty John Bonham Elton John, Bernie Taupin That's the Way It IsElvis Presley John Paul Jones
5 George Harrison Diana Ross The Beatles Ritchie Blackmore Ian Paice John Fogerty PearlJanis Joplin Roger Glover

1972

Printed in Go-Set on 30 December 1972, pages 5 & 6.[9] New category introduced: Newcomer; with old categories retired: Best Guitarist, Best Drummer, Best Bass Guitarist.[9]
Australian acts: pop poll results
Position Male Female Group Songwriter Album Single Newcomer
1 Johnny Farnham Colleen Hewett Sherbet Brian Cadd Aztecs Live at SunburyBilly Thorpe & the Aztecs "Boppin' the Blues" – Blackfeather Robin Jolley
2 Russell Morris Allison Durbin Billy Thorpe & the Aztecs Rick Springfield Beginnings "You're All Woman" Johnny Christie
3 Rick Springfield Alison McCallum Blackfeather Russell Morris The Shows "Most People I Know" – Billy Thorpe & the Aztecs Glen Cardier
4 Jeff Phillips Wendy Saddington Spectrum Mike Rudd MilesagoSpectrum "Rock Me Baby" Rick Springfield
5 Billy Thorpe Jeannie Lewis Daddy Cool Johnny Young Blood StoneRussell Morris "Walking the Floor on My Hands" – Johnny Farnham Jamie Redfern
International acts: pop poll results
Position Male Female Group Songwriter Album Single
1 Cat Stevens Carole King The Rolling Stones Cat Stevens Teaser and the FirecatCat Stevens "American Pie" – Don McLean
2 David Cassidy Roberta Flack The Bee Gees Elton John Thick As a BrickJethro Tull "School's Out" – Alice Cooper
3 Elvis Presley Melanie Slade Neil Diamond Slade Alive!Slade "Take Me Bak 'Ome" – Slade
4 Joe Cocker Janis Joplin Creedence Clearwater Revival Paul McCartney Elvis: As Recorded at Madison Square GardenElvis Presley "Puppy Love" – Donny Osmond
5 Rod Stewart Karen Carpenter Led Zeppelin John Lennon American PieDon McLean "Long Cool Woman" – The Hollies

1967–1978: King of Pop Awards

Teen-oriented pop music newspaper, Go-Set was established in February 1966 and conducted an annual poll of its readers to determine the most popular personalities.[3][6] In 1967 the most popular performer was Normie Rowe and when the results were televised on the unrelated The Go!! Show there was a crowning of Rowe as 'King of Pop'.[3][6] In the following years, TV Week provided coupons for readers to vote for their choice, a similar system had been in use for TV's Logie Awards since 1960. The 'King of Pop' awards ceremony was broadcast by the 0–10 Network from 1967 to 1975, and from 1976 to 1978 by the Nine Network.[1] On the 0–10 Network, from 1972, it was run by Johnny Young's production company (Lewis-Young Productions) which also provided Young Talent Time.[10]

1967

1968

  • King of Pop – Normie Rowe[3][6]

1969

Durbin is often referred to as the 'Queen of Pop',[nb 1] however:

I never in fact won a queen of pop award. the award was called The King of Pop awards, so that's when it was the Go Set [awards]. And it continued on to TV week.
—Allison Durbin[13]19 October 2003, ABC-TV series Love is in the Air Episode 2: "She's Leaving Home"

1970

  • King of Pop – Johnny Farnham[3][6][11]
  • Best Female Artist[nb 1] — Allison Durbin[3][6]

1971

Guest presenter: Liberace[14]
Award winners:[3]

  • King of Pop — Johnny Farnham[6][11]
  • Best Female Artist[nb 1] — Allison Durbin[6]
  • Best Album – Bloodstone (Russell Morris)
  • Best Bass Guitarist – Beeb Birtles (Frieze)
  • Best Dressed Female Performer – Allison Durbin
  • Best Dressed Male Performer – Johnny Farnham
  • Best Drummer – Gary Young (Daddy Cool)
  • Best Group — Daddy Cool
  • Best Lead Guitarist – Rick Springfield (Zoot)
  • Best Organist – Jenny Johnson (New Dream)
  • Best Songwriter – Russell Morris for "Mr America"[15]
  • Outstanding Newcomer[nb 2]Jamie Redfern[14][16]

1972

TV Week King of Pop Awards
Country Australia
Presented by TV Week
First awarded 1972
Last awarded 1978

Award winners:[3]

  • King of Pop — Johnny Farnham[6][11]
  • Queen of Pop[nb 1]Colleen Hewett[6]
  • Best Arranger – Geoff Hales
  • Best Dressed Female – Judy Stone
  • Best Dressed Male – Jeff Phillips
  • Best New Talent – Robin Jolley
  • Best Songwriter – Billy Thorpe (Billy Thorpe & the Aztecs)
  • Biggest Selling L.P. – Teaser and the Firecat (Cat Stevens)[17]
  • Biggest Selling Single – "The Rangers Waltz" (The Moms & Dads)[18]
  • Contribution to Teenage Television – Brian Henderson
  • Most Popular Australian Album – When You Wish Upon a Star (Jamie Redfern)
  • Most Popular Australian Musician – Rick Springfield (solo)
  • Most Popular Australian Single – "Walking the Floor" (Johnny Farnham)
  • Most Popular Group — Billy Thorpe & the Aztecs
  • Most Popular Overseas Group — The Bee Gees[19]
  • Most Popular Overseas L.P. — American Pie (Don McLean)[20]
  • Special Gold Award for '20 years service to the Industry' – Johnny O'Keefe

1973

Guest presenter: Davy Jones[1] (ex-The Monkees)
Award winners:[3]

  • King of Pop — Johnny Farnham[6][11]
  • Queen of Pop — Colleen Hewett[6]
  • Best New Talent — Linda George
  • Best Songwriter – Brian Cadd
  • Contribution to Australian Pop Industry – Brian Cadd
  • Most Popular Australian Album – Hits 1: Magic Rock 'N' Roll (Johnny Farnham)
  • Most Popular Australian Group — Sherbet[21]
  • Most Popular Australian Musician – Brian Cadd
  • Most Popular Australian Single – "Venus" (Jamie Redfern)

1974

King of Pop '74–'75
Shows winners trophy.

Ceremony details: Held on 8 March 1974, guest presenters: David Cassidy, Gary Glitter.[22] A compilation album titled King of Pop '74–'75 was released with tracks supplied by previous winners and guest presenters.[22] Next to the list of various artists, the cover depicts the trophy that was presented to award winners.[22]
Award winners:[3]

  • King of Pop — Jamie Redfern[6]
  • Queen of Pop — Debbie Byrne[6]
  • Best New Talent – Benjamin Hugg
  • Best Songwriter – Harry Vanda & George Young
  • Contribution to Australian Pop Industry – Brian Cadd
  • Most Popular Australian Album – My Name Means Horse (Ross Ryan)
  • Most Popular Australian Group – Sherbet[21]
  • Most Popular Australian Musician – Brian Cadd
  • Most Popular Australian Single – "Hitch a Ride" (Jamie Redfern)

1975

Ceremony details: Held October 1975, live performance: AC/DC "High Voltage"[23]
Award winners:[3]

  • King of Pop — Daryl Braithwaite[6][21] (Sherbet)
  • Queen of Pop – Debbie Byrne[6]
  • Australian Record of the Year — "Horror Movie" (Skyhooks)[11]
  • Best Australian Songwriter – Greg Macainsh[11] (Skyhooks)
  • Best New Talent — Mark Holden
  • Contribution to Australian Pop Industry – Countdown
  • Most Popular Australian Album – Ego is not a Dirty Word (Skyhooks)[11]
  • Most Popular Australian Group – Sherbet[21]
  • Most Popular Australian Single – "Summer Love" (Sherbet)[21]

1976

Award winners:[3]

  • King of Pop — Daryl Braithwaite[6][21] (Sherbet)
  • Queen of Pop — Marcia Hines[6]
  • Best Australian International Performer – Olivia Newton-John
  • Best Australian Record Producer – Richard Lush
  • Best Australian Songwriter – Harry Vanda & George Young
  • Best Australian TV Performer – Supernaut
  • Best Cover Design – Straight in a Gay Gay World (Skyhooks)
  • Contribution to Australian Pop Industry – Johnny O'Keefe
  • Most Popular Australian Album – Howzat (Sherbet)[11][21]
  • Most Popular Australian Group – Sherbet[11][21]
  • Most Popular Australian Single – "Howzat" (Sherbet)[11][21]
  • Most Popular New Group – Supernaut
  • Most Popular New Talent – Mark Holden

1977

Performer: Mark Holden[24]
Award winners:[3]

  • King of Pop — Daryl Braithwaite[6][21] (Sherbet)
  • Queen of Pop — Marcia Hines[6][24]
  • Australian Record of the Year — "Help Is on Its Way" (Little River Band)[11]
  • Best Australian International Performers – Little River Band[11]
  • Best Australian Record Producer – Peter Dawkins
  • Best Australian Songwriter – Glenn Shorrock
  • Best Australian TV Performer – The Ferrets on Countdown
  • Best Cover Design – Trees (Doug Ashdown)
  • Most Popular Australian Album – Photoplay (Sherbet)[21]
  • Most Popular Australian Country Musician – Slim Dusty
  • Most Popular Australian Group – Sherbet[21]
  • Most Popular Australian Single – "Magazine Madonna" (Sherbet)[21]
  • Most Popular New Group — Dragon
  • Most Popular New Talent – John St. Peeters

1978

Ceremony details: Held on 13 October 1978,[25][26] hosted by Glen Shorrock, guest presenters: Kate Bush,[25] Leif Garrett[26]
Award winners:[3]

  • King of Pop — John Paul Young[6][27]
  • Queen of Pop – Marcia Hines[6][27]
  • Australian Record of the Year — "Reminiscing" (Little River Band)
  • Best Australian Record Producer – Harry Vanda & George Young
  • Best Australian Songwriter – Harry Vanda & George Young
  • Best Australian TV Performer – Skyhooks "Hotel Hell" on Nightmoves and Little River Band "Help Is on Its Way" on Paul Hogan Show
  • Best Cover Design – Peter Ledger for the album cover of The Angels' Face to Face
  • Most Popular Australian Album – Sleeper Catcher (Little River Band)
  • Most Popular Australian Country Musician – Slim Dusty
  • Most Popular Australian Group – Sherbet[21]
  • Most Popular Australian Single – "Love Is in the Air" (John Paul Young)
  • Most Popular New Group — The Sports
  • Most Popular New Talent – Paul O'Gorman
  • Outstanding Contribution to Australian Music Industry – Nightmoves (Australian TV series)
  • Outstanding Local Achievement – Dragon

1979–1980: TV Week/Countdown Music Awards

TV Week / Countdown Music Awards
Country Australia
Presented by TV Week, Countdown
First awarded 1980 (for 1979 works)
Last awarded 1981 (for 1980 works)

Countdown was an Australian pop music TV series on national broadcaster ABC-TV from 1974–1987,[5] it presented music awards from 1979–1987,[4] initially in conjunction with magazine TV Week which had sponsored the previously existing 'King of Pop' Awards.[1] The TV Week/Countdown Rock Music Awards were a combination of popular-voted and peer-voted awards.[3]

The award year below relates to the year of achievement and not the year they were presented.[28]

1979

Ceremony details: Held on 13 April 1980, broadcast on Countdown by ABC-TV, the TV Week Rock Music Awards for 1979 presented a revamped awards ceremony with 'King of Pop' title replaced by 'Most Popular Male' and 'Queen of Pop' replaced by 'Most Popular Female'.[1][29] Hosted by Glen Shorrock of Little River Band, there were three live performances: Christie Allen "He's My Number 1", Australian Crawl "Beautiful People" and Split Enz "I Got You".[29][30] Various music industry personalities explained the categories, announced nominees and presented the 1979 awards.[29][30] 'Most Popular' awards were voted for by readers of TV Week sending in printed coupons, with the three highest reader responses read out as nominations.[29] Industry awards were voted for by radio programme directors, rock magazine editors and journalists.[29] Presenters included Darryl Cotton, Richard Gower (Racey), John O'Keefe (son of Johnny O'Keefe), John Farnham, Colleen Hewett, Graeme Strachan, Ian "Molly" Meldrum, and Harry Casey (KC & the Sunshine Band).[29]

Award winners and nominees:[3][4][28][29][30]

1980

Ceremony details: Held on 16 March 1981 at Regent Theatre Sydney, and broadcast on 22 March, it was hosted by Countdown host Ian "Molly" Meldrum and international guests Suzi Quatro and Jermaine Jackson.[32] Presenters included: Lee Simons, Donnie Sutherland, Marc Hunter, James Freud, Graham Russell, Russell Hitchcock and David Tickle.[32] Performers were: Split Enz "History Never Repeats",[33] Flowers "Icehouse",[34] The Swingers "Counting the Beat", Air Supply "Lost in Love", "Every Woman in the World" and "All Out of Love", Australian Crawl "The Boys Light Up".[32] Cold Chisel performed the last live number, "My Turn to Cry", to close the show and then trashed their instruments and the set.[5][7][32] Sponsors TV Week withdrew their support for the awards and Countdown held its own awards ceremonies thereafter.[1]

Award winners and nominees:[3][4][28][32]

  • Best Australian Album
  • Best Australian Producer
  • Best Australian Record Cover Design
  • Best Single Record
  • Best Recorded Song Writer
  • Best New Talent (Johnny O'Keefe Memorial Award)
  • Most Outstanding Achievement (for excellence in the presentation or production of Australian rock music by an individual performer, group or group member)[28]
  • Most Popular Female
    • Christie Allen[31]
    • Annalise Morrow (The Numbers)
    • Lynda Nutter (The Dugites)
  • Most Popular Group
    • Australian Crawl
    • Cold Chisel
    • Split Enz
  • Most Popular Male Performer
  • Most Popular Record
    • The Boys Light Up – Australian Crawl
    • EastCold Chisel
    • True Colours – Split Enz
  • Best Disc Jockey (winners only, by State)
    • Ian McCray 2SM Sydney, New South Wales
    • Wayne Roberts 4BK Brisbane, Queensland
    • Steve Curtis 5AD Adelaide, South Australia
    • Jim Franklin 7HT Hobart, Tasmania
    • Greg Evans 3XY Melbourne, Victoria
    • Garry Shannon 6 pm Perth, West Australia

1981–1986: Countdown Music and Video Awards

Countdown Music and Video Awards
Country Australia
Presented by Countdown
First awarded 1982 (for 1981 works)
Last awarded 1987 (for 1986 works)

Countdown was an Australian pop music TV series on national broadcaster ABC-TV from 1974–1987,[11] it presented music awards from 1979–1987,[4] initially in conjunction with magazine TV Week which had sponsored the previously existing 'King of Pop' Awards.[1] After Cold Chisel performed at the 1980 awards ceremony, and then trashed their instruments and the set,[32] sponsors TV Week withdrew their support and Countdown held its own awards ceremonies until the 1986 awards which were broadcast in 1987.[1] The awards ceremony was co-produced by Carolyn James (aka Carolyn Bailey) during 1981–1984 in collaboration with the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA),[35][36][37] which provided peer voting for some awards. Countdown provided coupons in the related Countdown Magazine for viewers to vote for some awards including 'Most Popular Male Performer', 'Most Popular Female Performer', 'Most Popular Group' and 'Most Popular International Act'.[38] From 1987 ARIA instituted its own entirely peer-voted ARIA Music Awards.[8]

The award year below relates to the year of achievement and not the year they were presented.[28]

1981

Ceremony details: Broadcast on 18 April 1982, hosted by Ian "Molly" Meldrum with presenters: Greedy Smith, Ross Wilson, Michael Hutchence, Duran Duran, Sharon O'Neill, Renée Geyer, John Swan, John Paul Young, Daryl Braithwaite, Alex Smith and Angry Anderson.[39] Performers were: Men at Work, Sharon O'Neill, Renée Geyer, Mental As Anything, Billy Field, Mondo Rock and the Divinyls.[39]

Award winners and nominees:[4][28][39]

  • Best Australian Album
    • ChemistryMondo Rock[11]
  • Best Australian Producer
    • Peter Dawkins[40]
  • Best Australian Single
    • "If You Leave Me, Can I Come Too?" – Mental As Anything[11]
  • Best Australian Songwriter
    • Eric McCusker – Mondo Rock
  • Best New Talent
    • Men at Work
  • Most Outstanding Achievement
    • Air Supply[11]
  • Most Popular Female
    • Sharon O'Neill
  • Most Popular Male Performer

Nominees included: Men at Work, Divinyls, Moving Pictures, Sharon O'Neill, Renée Geyer, Billy Field, Mental As Anything, Marcia Hines, Split Enz, Mondo Rock, Australian Crawl, Cold Chisel, Midnight Oil.[39]

1982

Ceremony details: Held on 19 April 1983.[41]

Award winners and nominees:[4][28][41]

  • Best Australian Album
  • Best Debut Single
    • "Solid Rock" – Goanna
  • Best New Talent (Johnny O'Keefe Memorial Award)
  • Most Outstanding Achievement
    • Men at Work
  • Most Popular Group
    • Split Enz

Nominees included: The Angels, Moving Pictures, Goanna, Jo Kennedy, Divinyls, Eurogliders, Rose Tattoo, Split Enz, The Reels, Icehouse, Men at Work, Skyhooks.[41]

1983

Ceremony details: Held on 15 April 1984 at the Palais Theatre, presenters included: Ross Wilson, Glen Shorrock, Pat Wilson, Graeme "Shirley" Strachan, Greg Ham, Ian "Molly" Meldrum, Jon Farriss, Michael Hutchence, Marc Hunter, Billy Idol.[43] Live performers: Kids in the Kitchen "Bitter Desire", Models "I Hear Motion", Ross Wilson and Pat Wilson "Strong Love", Pseudo Echo "A Beat for You", Billy Idol "Rebel Yell", Tim Finn "In a Minor Key".[43] The closing live performance was by an ensemble including Shorrock, Lynne Randell, Jim Keays, Darryl Cotton, Debbie Byrne, Strachan, Keith Lamb, John Paul Young, Daryl Braithwaite, and Hunter to commemorate the 25th Anniversary of Johnny O'Keefe's version of "Shout!".[43]

Award winners and nominees:[4][28][43][44]

  • Best Promotional Video
    • The Expression's "With Closed Eyes"
    • Tim Finn's "Fraction too Much Friction" – Richard Lowenstein
    • Mental as Anything's "Spirit Got Lost"
    • Midnight Oil's "Power and the Passion"
    • Pat Wilson's "Bop Girl"
  • Best Record Producer of the Year
    • Bruce Brown and Russell Dunlop for work with Machinations, Reels, and Mental as Anything
    • Charles Fisher for work with Moving Pictures, Hoodoo Gurus, The Expression
    • Mark Moffatt and Ricky Fataar for work with Tim Finn, Renée Geyer, Pat Wilson
    • Mark Opitz for work with Australian Crawl, INXS, Divinyls
  • Most Popular Male Performer
  • Most Promising New Talent (Johnny O'Keefe Award)
    • Kids in the Kitchen
    • Pseudo Echo
    • Real Life
  • Songwriter of the Year
    • Tim Finn
    • Colin Hay
    • Eric McCusker

1984

Ceremony details: Held on 19 May 1985 at Sydney Entertainment Centre, and broadcast on 25 May, it was hosted by Greedy Smith, presenters included: Brian Mannix, Meat Loaf, Vicki O'Keefe, Sharon O'Neill, Ian "Molly" Meldrum, Nik Kershaw, Grace Knight and Bernie Lynch (Eurogliders), Julian Lennon, Jenny Morris, Sean Kelly and James Freud (Models), Alan Johnson and Danny Simcic (Real Life), Suzanne Dowling (Rock Arena TV show host).[45] INXS won seven awards and closed with a live performance of "Burn for You", dressed in Akubras (hats) and Drizabones (outdoor coats/oilskin jackets).[6][45]

Award winners and nominees:[4]

  • Best Debut Single
    • "Trust Me" – I'm Talking
  • Best Female Performance in a Video
    • Sharon O'Neill
  • Best Group Performance in a Video
    • "Burn for You" – INXS
  • Best Male Performance in a Video
    • Jimmy Barnes
  • Best Producer
    • Martin Armiger
  • Most Outstanding Achievement
    • INXS
  • Most Popular Australian Group
    • INXS
  • Most Popular Female Performer
    • Sharon O'Neill
  • Most Popular International Act
    • Duran Duran
  • Most Popular Male Performer
    • Michael Hutchence (INXS)
  • Most Promising Talent (Johnny O'Keefe Memorial Award)

1985

Ceremony details: Held on 14 April 1986 at Melbourne Sports and Entertainment Centre, and broadcast on 20 April, it was hosted by Ian "Molly" Meldrum and presenters included: Grace Knight and Bernie Lynch (Eurogliders), Rick Mayall and Ben Elton (The Young Ones), Sting, Vince Sorrenti, Brad Robinson, Zan Abeyratne, Richard Page, Iva Davies, Brian Canham, Brian Mannix, Tim Finn, Dee C Lee, Suzanne Dowling and Bob Geldof.[46][47] Performers were: Pseudo Echo "Living in a Dream", Eurogliders "Absolutely", Do-Ré-Mi "Theme from Jungle Jim", Kids in the Kitchen "Current Stand", Mr. Mister "Kyrie", Models "Let's Build it Up", I'm Talking "Do You Wanna Be?".[47] At the awards ceremony fans of INXS and Uncanny X-Men scuffled and as a result ARIA decided to hold their own awards,[37] which were the entirely peer-voted ARIA Music Awards first held in 1987.[8]

  • Best Album
    • FundamentalsMental As Anything
  • Best Group Performance in a Video
    • "Live it Up" – Mental As Anything
  • Best Male Performance in a Video
    • "Working Class Man" – Jimmy Barnes
  • Best Producer
    • Mark Opitz
  • Best Video
    • INXS's "What You Need" – Richard Lowenstein and Lyn-Marie Milbourn
  • Best Single
    • "Out of Mind, Out of Sight" – Models
    • "Live it Up" – Mental As Anything
  • Best Songwriter
  • Most Popular Australian Group
    • INXS
    • Uncanny X-Men
  • Most Popular Female Performer
    • Sharon O'Neill
  • Most Popular International Act
    • Duran Duran
    • Madonna
  • Most Popular Male Performer
    • Tim Finn
    • Brian Mannix
  • Most Promising Talent (Johnny O'Keefe Memorial Award)
    • Do-Ré-Mi

1986

Ceremony details: Held on 19 July 1987 at Sydney Opera House, it followed the last regular Countdown show.[6][48] It was hosted by Ian "Molly" Meldrum who revealed his bald head in imitation of Peter Garrett of Midnight Oil.[5][6][48] Performers included: Icehouse "Crazy",[34] Angry Anderson "Suddenly",[49] and Mental As Anything "He's Just No Good".[50]

By the time of the last Countdown award ceremony, the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) had already instituted its own entirely peer-voted ARIA Music Awards,[8] with its first ceremony held on 2 March 1987 at the Sheraton Wentworth Hotel in Sydney.[51] Elton John was the host but the ARIAs were not televised with presenters including Basia Bonkowski, Slim Dusty and Donnie Sutherland.[51]

  • Best Debut Album
  • Best Female Performance in a Video
  • Best Group Performance in a Video
  • Best Male Performance in a Video
  • Best Producer
  • Best Video
  • Best Single
  • Best Songwriter
  • Most Outstanding Achievement
  • Most Popular Australian Group
  • Most Popular Male Performer
  • Most Promising Talent (Johnny O'Keefe Memorial Award)

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e 'Best Female Artist' Allison Durbin was popularly called 'Queen of Pop',[1][3][10][12] however the first official 'Queen of Pop' was Colleen Hewett in 1972.
  2. ^ 'Outstanding Newcomer' award was called 'Best New Talent' from 1972. Redfern won the TV Week Logie Award for 'Best New Talent' in 1972 for his performance at the 1971 King of Pop Awards and as an original member of Young Talent Time, Redfern signed a touring/recording contract with guest presenter Liberace.[14][16]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Kimball, Duncan (2002). "King of Pop" Awards: Kings & Queens of Pop 1967–1978"TV Week". Milesago: Australasian Music and Popular Culture 1964–1975. Ice Productions. Archived from the original on 16 December 2010. Retrieved 16 December 2010. 
  2. ^ "The History of Australian TV: Top 40 TV". TelevisionAU. 12 April 2006. Retrieved 16 December 2010. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v "Australian Music Awards". Ron Jeff. Retrieved 16 December 2010. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Countdown to the Awards" ( 
  5. ^ a b c d  
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac Jenkins, Jeff;  
  7. ^ a b Kimball, Duncan (2002). "Countdown"Media – Television – . Milesago: Australasian Music and Popular Culture 1964–1975. Ice Productions. Archived from the original on 25 November 2010. Retrieved 16 December 2010. 
  8. ^ a b c d "ARIA Awards".  
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Kent, David Martin (September 2002). "The place of Go-Set in rock and pop music culture in Australia, 1966 to 1974" (Portable Document Format (PDF)).   Note: This PDF is 282 pages.
  10. ^ a b Elder, John (3 June 2007). "Fears for Durbin's well-being".  
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac Atkinson, Ann; Linsay Knight; Margaret McPhee (1996). The dictionary of performing arts in Australia.  
  12. ^ a b Tippet, Gary (5 February 2006). "Fall of a pop royal".  
  13. ^ "" Episode 2: "She's Leaving HomeLove is in the Air". Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). 19 October 2003. Retrieved 2008-12-06. 
  14. ^ a b c "Jamie Redfern". The Boy Choir & Soloist Directory. Archived from the original on 25 November 2008. Retrieved 2008-12-03. 
  15. ^ "Russell Morris". Milesago. Retrieved 2008-12-08. 
  16. ^ a b "Cooking up a storm".  
  17. ^ "2007/50/34 Music award, TV Week King of Pop, Cat Stevens, wood / metal / cloth, made by Paramount, used by Festival Records, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1972". Powerhouse Museum. Retrieved 2008-12-05. 
  18. ^ "2007/50/32 Music award, TV Week King of Pop, The Mom and Dads, wood / metal / cloth, made by Paramount, used by Festival Records, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1972". Powerhouse Museum. Retrieved 2008-12-03. 
  19. ^ "Bee Gees King of Pop award, 1972". Powerhouse Museum. Retrieved 2008-12-03. 
  20. ^ "2007/50/33 Music award, TV Week King of Pop, Don McLean, wood / metal / cloth, made by Paramount, used by Festival Records, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1972". Powerhouse Museum. Retrieved 2008-12-03. 
  21. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "Sherbet". Music Australia. 3 April 2007. Retrieved 2008-12-08. 
  22. ^ a b c "King of Pop '74–'75". David Cassidy Downunder Fansite. Archived from the original on 23 November 2008. Retrieved 2008-12-06. 
  23. ^ (2 DVD set)"Plug Me In"AC/DC . Amazon.com. Archived from the original on 28 December 2008. Retrieved 2008-12-03. 
  24. ^ a b "Flashback archive". Televisionau.com. Retrieved 2013-11-19. 
  25. ^ a b "The girl with the child in her eyes... and the angel in her voice". gaffa.org. Archived from the original on 20 October 2008. Retrieved 2008-12-03. 
  26. ^ a b "Where Are They Now? Kate Bush". bmusic. 28 March 2004. Retrieved 2008-12-08. 
  27. ^ a b :: History :: Transcript :: King and Queen of Pop"George Negus Tonight". Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). 17 March 2003. Retrieved 2008-12-03. 
  28. ^ a b c d e f g h i Angus Cameron, ed. (1985). The Australian Almanac.  
  29. ^ a b c d e f g "TV Week Rock Music Awards 1980". rage. 11 January 2009. Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). ABC1.
  30. ^ a b c Show no.:235 Date: 19/4/1980"Countdown". Countdown Archives. Retrieved 2008-12-03. 
  31. ^ a b Acts – Christie Allen"Countdown"Popular . Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). Retrieved 2009-02-08. 
  32. ^ a b c d e f Show no.:241 Date: 22/3/1981"Countdown". Countdown Archives. Retrieved 2008-12-03. 
  33. ^ Acts – Split Enz"Countdown"Popular . Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). 2006. Retrieved 2009-02-08. 
  34. ^ a b c d Acts – Icehouse"Countdown"Popular . Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). 2006. Retrieved 2008-12-11. 
  35. ^ "WAM Scene". Western Australia Music Industry Association Incorporated. 2005. Archived from the original on 20 July 2008. Retrieved 2008-12-10. 
  36. ^ Story"Countdown"The . Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). 2006. Retrieved 2008-12-10. 
  37. ^ a b "The quirks that made it work".  
  38. ^ "Countdown Magazine" (PDF). Australian Broadcasting Corporation. January 1986. Retrieved 2009-02-07. 
  39. ^ a b c d Show no.:539 Date: 18/4/1982"Countdown". Countdown Archives. Retrieved 2008-12-04. 
  40. ^ "A little help from my friends – transcript". Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). 27 February 2006. Retrieved 2009-01-15. 
  41. ^ a b c Date: 19/4/1983"Countdown". Countdown Archives. Retrieved 2008-12-04. 
  42. ^ Swift, Brendan. "Moving Pictures > Biography".  
  43. ^ a b c d Show No.: 2a Date: 15/4/1984"Countdown". Countdown Archives. Retrieved 2008-12-04. 
  44. ^ Awards on Sunday"Countdown".  
  45. ^ a b Date: 19/5/1985"Countdown". Countdown Archives. Retrieved 2008-12-04. 
  46. ^ Show No.: 396 Date: 20/4/1986"Countdown". Countdown Archives. Retrieved 2008-12-04. 
  47. ^ a b 20th April 1986"Countdown". Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). 27 January 2007. Retrieved 2008-12-12. 
  48. ^ a b Show No.: 563 Date: 19/7/1987"Countdown". Countdown Archives. Retrieved 2008-12-04. 
  49. ^ Acts – Angry Anderson"Countdown"Popular . Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). 2006. Retrieved 2008-12-11. 
  50. ^ Performers – Mental As Anything"Countdown"Popular . Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). Retrieved 2009-02-08. 
  51. ^ a b "1987: 1st Annual ARIA Awards".  
  52. ^ Winstead, Kathleen (19 November 1990). "New Band Injects Energetic Musical Jolt into Pop".  
  53. ^ a b c Acts – A-Ha"Countdown"Popular . Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). Retrieved 2009-02-07. 
  54. ^ "1987 – the year of Bond". darsu.btinternet.co.uk. Archived from the original on 22 March 2009. Retrieved 2009-02-07. 
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.