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Disposition

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Disposition

A disposition is a habit, a preparation, a state of readiness, or a tendency to act in a specified way.

The terms dispositional belief and occurrent belief refer, in the former case, to a belief that is held in the mind but not currently being considered, and in the latter case, to a belief that is currently being considered by the mind.

In Bourdieu's theory of fields, dispositions are the natural tendencies of each individual to take on a certain position in any field. There is no strict determinism through one's dispositions. In fact, the habitus is the choice of positions according to one's dispositions. However, in retrospect a space of possibles can always be observed.

A disposition is not a process or event in some duration in time, but rather the state, preparation, or tendency of a structure "in waiting". In the field of possibilities its actual triggering has a statistical value.

In analytic philosophy

In contemporary analytic philosophy, dispositions have been suggested as having an important role in understanding laws of nature. Dispositionalism is the idea that the dispositions of objects (for instance, the disposition for a wine glass to break if dropped on a hard floor) are a specific and ontologically important set of properties (either universals or tropes) that objects have.

Philosophers who subscribe to this theory include Brian Ellis, C.B. Martin and John Heil.[1][2] Dispositionalism is offered as an alternative to other accounts of laws of nature including neo-Humean regularity theories and relations-between-universals theory of David Malet Armstrong, Fred Dretske,[3] and Michael Tooley.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Dispositions
  2. ^ Armstrong, D.M. (2010). Sketch for a Systematic Metaphysics. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 48–53.  
  3. ^ Dretske, Fred. "Laws of Nature". Philosophy of Science 44 (2): 248–268.  
  4. ^ Tooley, Michael (1977). "The Nature of Laws". Canadian Journal of Philosophy 7 (4): 667–698. 

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