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Lanyin Mandarin

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Lanyin Mandarin

Lan–Yin Mandarin
Region Silk Road
Native speakers
10 million  (date missing)
Sino-Tibetan
Language codes
ISO 639-3
ISO 639-6 lyiu
Glottolog xibe1241[1]
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Lan–Yin Mandarin is the light yellow.

Lan–Yin Mandarin (Lanyin) (simplified Chinese: 兰银官话; traditional Chinese: 蘭銀官話; pinyin: Lán–Yín Guānhuà) is a dialect of Mandarin Chinese traditionally spoken throughout Gansu province and in the northern part of Ningxia. In recent decades it has expanded into northern Xinjiang.[2] It forms part of Central Mandarin (中部官话) with Central Plains Mandarin (中原官话).[3] The name is a compound of the capitals of the two former provinces where it dominates, Lanzhou and Yinchuan, which are also two of its principal subdialects.

Among Chinese Muslims, it is sometimes written in the Arabic alphabet.

Sub-dialects

References

  1. ^ Nordhoff, Sebastian; Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2013). "Xibei Guanhua (Northwest Mandarin)". Glottolog 2.2. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. 
  2. ^ China - Page 902 Chung Wah Chow, David Eimer, Caroline B Heller - 2009 "Language Most of the population in Qīnghǎi speaks a northwestern Chinese dialect similar to Gānsùhuà (part of the Lan–Yin Mandarin family). Tibetans speak the Amdo or Kham dialects of Tibetan. It's possible to travel almost everywhere using ..."
  3. ^ Cahiers de linguistique, Asie orientale - Volumes 37-38 -2008 - Page 6 "兰银官话 Lányín Mandarin.."


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