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New Hampshire's 1st congressional district

New Hampshire's 1st congressional district
New Hampshire's 1st congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
New Hampshire's 1st congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Current Representative Frank Guinta (RManchester)
Distribution 66.69% urban, 33.31% rural
Population (2013 ACS[1]) 662,473
Median income $64,681
Ethnicity 93.6% White, 1.3% Black, 2.3% Asian, 3.2% Hispanic, 0.2% Native American
Cook PVI R+1[2]

New Hampshire's 1st congressional district covers the southeastern part of New Hampshire. The district consists of three general areas: Greater Manchester, the Seacoast and the Lakes Region.

It is represented in the United States House of Representatives by Republican Frank Guinta.

Politically, the 1st district is one of the most competitive congressional districts in the country, with a Cook Partisan Voting Index of R+1. The district has ousted three incumbents in the past ten years and has given no candidate more than 54% of the vote since 2004.

Contents

  • Cities and towns in the district 1
  • List of Representatives 2
  • Competitiveness 3
  • Historical district boundaries 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6

Cities and towns in the district

The district includes:

List of Representatives

District organized from New Hampshire's At-large congressional district in 1847

Representative Party Years Electoral history
Amos Tuck Independent March 4, 1847 –
March 3, 1849
Lost re-election
Free Soil March 4, 1849 –
March 3, 1851
Whig March 4, 1851 –
March 3, 1853
George W. Kittredge Democratic March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
Lost re-election
James Pike American March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
Retired
Republican March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1859
Gilman Marston Republican March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1863
Daniel Marcy Democratic March 4, 1863 –
March 3, 1865
Lost re-election
Gilman Marston Republican March 4, 1865 –
March 3, 1867
Jacob Hart Ela Republican March 4, 1867 –
March 3, 1871
Ellery Albee Hibbard Democratic March 4, 1871 –
March 3, 1873
Lost re-election
William B. Small Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1875
Frank Jones Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1879
Joshua G. Hall Republican March 4, 1879 –
March 3, 1883
Martin Alonzo Haynes Republican March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1887
Lost re-election
Luther F. McKinney Democratic March 4, 1887 –
March 3, 1889
Lost re-election
Alonzo Nute Republican March 4, 1889 –
March 3, 1891
Luther F. McKinney Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1893
Henry William Blair Republican March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1895
Cyrus A. Sulloway Republican March 4, 1895 –
March 3, 1913
Eugene Elliott Reed Democratic March 4, 1913 –
March 3, 1915
Lost re-election
Cyrus A. Sulloway Republican March 4, 1915 –
March 11, 1917
Died
Vacant March 11, 1917 –
May 29, 1917
Sherman Everett Burroughs Republican May 29, 1917 –
January 27, 1923
Died
Vacant January 27, 1923 –
March 3, 1923
William Nathaniel Rogers Democratic March 4, 1923 –
March 3, 1925
Lost re-election
Fletcher Hale Republican March 4, 1925 –
October 22, 1931
Died
Vacant October 22, 1931 –
January 5, 1932
William Nathaniel Rogers Democratic January 5, 1932 –
January 3, 1937
Retired to run for U.S. Senate
Arthur B. Jenks Republican January 3, 1937 –
June 9, 1938
Lost seat due to contested election
Alphonse Roy Democratic June 9, 1938 –
January 3, 1939
Lost re-election
Arthur B. Jenks Republican January 3, 1939 –
January 3, 1943
Lost re-nomination
Chester Earl Merrow Republican January 3, 1943 –
January 3, 1963
Retired to run for U.S. Senate
Louis C. Wyman Republican January 3, 1963 –
January 3, 1965
Lost re-election
Joseph Oliva Huot Democratic January 3, 1965 –
January 3, 1967
Lost re-election
Louis C. Wyman Republican January 3, 1967 –
December 31, 1974
Retired to run for U.S. Senate

Resigned early
Vacant December 31, 1974 –
January 3, 1975
Norman D'Amours Democratic January 3, 1975 –
January 3, 1985
Retired to run for U.S. Senate
Bob Smith Republican January 3, 1985 –
December 7, 1990
Resigned on appointment to U.S. Senate
Vacant December 7, 1990 –
January 3, 1991
Bill Zeliff Republican January 3, 1991 –
January 3, 1997
Retired to run for N.H. Governor
John E. Sununu Republican January 3, 1997 –
January 3, 2003
Retired to run for U.S. Senate
Jeb Bradley Republican January 3, 2003 –
January 3, 2007
Lost re-election
Carol Shea-Porter Democratic January 3, 2007 –
January 3, 2011
Lost re-election
Frank Guinta Republican January 3, 2011 –
January 3, 2013
Lost re-election
Carol Shea-Porter Democratic January 3, 2013 –
January 3, 2015
Lost re-election
Frank Guinta Republican January 3, 2015 –
Incumbent

Competitiveness

The first district is a swing district.

Election results from presidential races:

Year Office Results
2000 President Al Gore 46%
2004 President John Kerry 48%
2008 President Barack Obama 53 - John McCain 47%
2012 President Barack Obama 50 - Mitt Romney 49%

Historical district boundaries

2003 - 2013

See also

References

  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1989). The Historical Atlas of Political Parties in the United States Congress. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company. 
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1982). The Historical Atlas of United States Congressional Districts. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company. 
  • Congressional Biographical Directory of the United States 1774–present
  1. ^ "ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates: 2013 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates (DP05)". U.S. Census Bureau American Factfinder. Retrieved January 14, 2015. 
  2. ^ "Partisan Voting Index Districts of the 113th Congress, Arranged by State/District" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. 


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