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Prisoner of conscience

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Prisoner of conscience

Aung San Suu Kyi was an Amnesty International-recognized prisoner of conscience from 1989 to 1995, from 2000 to 2002, and from 2003 to 2010.[1]

Prisoner of conscience (POC) is a term coined by Amnesty International, the term can refer to anyone imprisoned because of their race, sexual orientation, religion, or political views. It also refers to those who have been imprisoned and/or persecuted for the non-violent expression of their conscientiously held beliefs.

Contents

  • Definition 1
  • Current Amnesty International prisoners of conscience 2
    • Azerbaijan 2.1
    • Bahrain 2.2
    • Belarus 2.3
    • Cambodia 2.4
    • Eritrea 2.5
    • Ethiopia 2.6
    • The Gambia 2.7
    • India 2.8
    • Iran 2.9
    • Israel 2.10
    • Kuwait 2.11
    • Kyrgyzstan 2.12
    • Malaysia 2.13
    • Morocco 2.14
    • North Korea 2.15
    • People's Republic of China 2.16
    • Russia 2.17
    • Saudi Arabia 2.18
    • Singapore 2.19
    • Sudan 2.20
    • Syria 2.21
    • Thailand 2.22
    • Tunisia 2.23
    • Uzbekistan 2.24
    • Venezuela 2.25
    • Vietnam 2.26
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Definition

The article "Peter Benenson, published in The Observer 28 May 1961, launched the campaign "Appeal for Amnesty 1961" and first defined a "prisoner of conscience".[2]

Any person who is physically restrained (by imprisonment or otherwise) from expressing (in any form of words or symbols) any opinion which he honestly holds and which does not advocate or condone personal violence. We also exclude those people who have conspired with a foreign government to overthrow their own.

The primary goal for this year-long campaign, founded by the English lawyer Amnesty International.

Under British law,

  • Amnesty International resources about prisoners of conscience
  • Prisoners of Conscience Appeal Fund

External links

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  6. ^ Human Rights and the Dirty War in Mexico by Kate Doyle
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  33. ^ Iran: female prisoner’s conditions after 8 years behind bars - mojahedin.org - 24 Aug. 2015
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  36. ^ Habibollah Latifi’s Death Sentence Stopped By Leadership’s Pardon - hra-news.org - 2 Sept. 2015
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  43. ^ Jafar Panahi asks for Golden Bear winner Taxi to be shown in Iran - theguardian.com 17 Feb. 2015
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  46. ^ Saeed Shirzad - iranian.com - 3 Sept. 2015
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References

Cù Huy Hà Vũ;[84] Le Cong Dinh;[85] Nguyen Dan Que;[86] Nguyen Van Hai;[87] Nguyen Van Ly;[88] Phan Thanh Hai;[89] Ta Phong Tan;[89] Vi Duc Hoi;[90] Trần Huỳnh Duy Thức.[91]

Vietnam

Leopoldo López[83]

Venezuela

Azam Farmonov;[48] Alisher Karamatov;[48] Solijon Abdrahmanov[82]

Uzbekistan

Ramzi Abcha;[81] Ghazi Beji;[81]

Tunisia

Somyot Prueksakasemsuk[80]

Thailand

Ali al-Abdullah;[76] Mazen Darwish;[77] Shibal Ibrahim;[78] Riad Seif[79]

Syria

Ussamah Mohammed;[74] Faisal Saleh[75]

Sudan

Chee Soon Juan; Amos Yee;

Singapore

Raif Badawi;[68] Mohammad bin Saleh al-Bajadi;[69] Saud al-Hashimi;[70] Khaled al-Johani;[71] Hamza Kashgari[72][73]

Saudi Arabia

Mikhail Kosenko;[66] Nikolay Kavkazsky[67]

Russia

Chen Wei;[57] Dhondup Wangchen;[58] Ershidin Israil;[59] Gao Zhisheng;[60] Guo Feixiong;[61] Guo Xiaojun;[62] Liu Xiaobo;[63] Mao Hengfeng;[64] Shi Tao;[48] Wang Junling;[65] Wang Xiaodong[65]

People's Republic of China

[56]

North Korea

Ali Anouzla[54]

Morocco

Ali Abd Jalil[53]

Malaysia

Azimzhan Askarov[52]

Kyrgyzstan

Hamad al-Naqi[51]

Kuwait

Ahmad Qatamesh;[49] Bassem al-Tamimi[50]

Israel

Bahman Ahmadi Amou'i;[28] Zhila Bani-Yaghoub;[29] Arzhang Davoodi;[30] Ghoncheh Ghavami;[31] Kouhyar Goudarzi;[32] Zeynab Jalaliyan;[33] Mohammad Sadigh Kabudvand;[34] Zhila Karamzadeh-Makvandi;[35] Habibollah Latifi;[36] Hossein Ronaghi Maleki;[37] Narges Mohammadi;[38] Parvin Mokhtareh;[32] Abdollah Momeni;[39] Sayed Ziaoddin (Zia) Nabavi;[40] Mansour Osanlou;[41] Jafar Panahi;[42][43] Isa Saharkhiz;[29] Mohammad Seifzadeh;[44] Reza Shahabi;[45] Saeed Shirzad;[46] Abdolfattah Soltani;[44] Heshmat Tabarzadi;[47] Majid Tavakoli;[48]

Iran

Binayak Sen;[25] Soni Sori;[26] Irom Sharmila Chanu;[27]

India

Ebrima Manneh[24]

The Gambia

Eskinder Nega[23]

Ethiopia

Aster Fissehatsion;[21] Dawit Isaak;[22] Mahmoud Ahmed Sheriffo;[21] Petros Solomon;[21] Haile Woldetensae[21]

Eritrea

Yorm Bopha[20]

Cambodia

Mikalay Autukhovich;[16] Zmitser Dashkevich;[17] Iryna Khalip;[17] Eduard Lobau;[17] Uladzimir Niaklajeu;[17] Pavel Sevyarynets;[18] Mikola Statkevich[17] Anton Suryapin[19]

Belarus

Mahdi Abu Deeb;[13] Mohammad Sanad al-Makina;[14] and the Bahrain Thirteen: Abdulhadi al-Khawaja, Hassan Mushaima, Abdelwahab Hussain, Abdel-Jalil al-Singace, Mohammad Habib al-Miqdad, Abdel-Jalil al-Miqdad, Sa'eed Mirza al-Nuri, Mohammad Hassan Jawwad, Mohammad Ali Ridha Isma'il, Abdullah al-Mahroos, Abdul-Hadi Abdullah Hassan al-Mukhodher, Ebrahim Sharif, Salah Abdullah Hubail al-Khawaja[15]

Bahrain

Ilgar Mammadov, Republican Alternative Movement, Anar Bayramli;[8] Ramin Bayramov;[8] Arif Yunus,[9] Leyla Yunus,[9] Vidadi Isgandarov;[10] Taleh Khasmammadov;[8] and youth activists Bakhtiyar Guliyev, Mahammad Azizov, Shahin Novruzlu, Rashad Hasanov,[11] Rashadat Akhundov, Zaur Gurbanli, Uzeyir Mammadli and Ilkin Rustamzade[12]

Azerbaijan

Below is an incomplete list of individuals that Amnesty International considers to be prisoners of conscience, organized by country.

Current Amnesty International prisoners of conscience

The phrase is now widely used in political discussions to describe a political prisoner, whether or not Amnesty International has specifically adopted the case, although the phrase has a different scope and definition than that of political prisoner.[7]

Amnesty International has, since its founding, pressured governments to release those persons it considers to be prisoners of conscience.[5] Governments, conversely, tend to deny that the specific prisoners identified by Amnesty International are, in fact, being held on the grounds Amnesty claims; they allege that these prisoners pose genuine threats to the security of their countries.[6]

[4]" and is now a separate and independent charity which provides relief and rehabilitation grants to prisoners of conscience in the UK and around the world.Prisoners of Conscience Appeal Fund To work around this, the "Fund for the Persecuted" was established in 1962 to receive donations to support prisoners and their families. The name was later changed to the "[3]

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