World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Water stagnation

Article Id: WHEBN0005956526
Reproduction Date:

Title: Water stagnation  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Pollution, Water pollution, Pond, Slough (hydrology), Oxygenation (environmental)
Collection: Aquatic Ecology, Aquifers, Environmental Soil Science, Liquid Water, Water Pollution, Water Supply, Waterborne Diseases, Wetlands
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Water stagnation

Water stagnation occurs when water stops flowing. Stagnant water can be a major environmental hazard.[1]

Contents

  • Dangers 1
  • Life that may thrive in stagnant water 2
    • Fish 2.1
    • Insects 2.2
    • Other 2.3
  • See also 3
  • References 4

Dangers

Malaria and dengue are among the main dangers of stagnant water, which can become a breeding ground for the mosquitoes that transmit these diseases.

Stagnant water can be dangerous for drinking because it provides a better incubator than running water for many kinds of bacteria and parasites. Stagnant water is often contaminated with human and animal feces, particularly in deserts or other areas of low rain.[2]

Stagnant water may be classified into the following basic, although overlapping, types:-

Water body stagnation : stagnation in swamp,lake,lagoon,river, etc.

  • Surface and ground waters stagnation ;
  • Trapped water stagnation. The water may be trapped in human artifacts (discarded cans, plant pots, tires, dug-outs, roofs, etc.), as well as in natural containers, such as hollow tree trunks, leaf sheath etc....

To avoid ground and surface water stagnation, drainage of surface and subsoil is advised. Areas with a shallow water table are more susceptible to ground water stagnation due to the lower availability of natural soil drainage.

Life that may thrive in stagnant water

Some plants prefer flowing water, while others, such as lotuses, prefer stagnant water.

Various anaerobic bacteria are commonly found in stagnant water . For this reason, pools of stagnant water have historically been used in processing hemp and some other fiber crops, as well as linden bark used for making bast shoes. Several weeks of soaking makes bast fibers easily separable due to bacterial and fermentative processes known as retting.

Fish

Mosquito larvae in stagnant water

Insects

Stagnant water is the favorite breeding ground for a number of insects.

Other

See also

References

  1. ^ http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/general-article/panama-fever/
  2. ^ WHO.int
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.